The Dangers of Working within Paediatrics

Just when I thought I was out of the woods, I was re-exposed to the most dangerous paediatric affliction of all:

Let-It-Go-itis.

Contrary to its name, this troubling and traumatic condition is just damn hard to let go. It infects the motor and memory recall systems and results in people unconsciously humming or singing to its tune. It has the potential of infecting other people. Prognosis: Very contagious. A full recovery is possible but in the order of weeks so long as you are not re-exposed to it.

84 plays

I’m Making Believe by Ella Fitzgerald and the Ink Spots.

The day is over and the weekend has started. It is time to put on some music to help put me in a relaxing mood.

Whoever thought of…

…Embedding a Starbucks store right inside of a hospital is a genius.

These stores are make a killing of my wallet.

Two Schedules on Shared Time

The challenge of my current schedule is that I must juggle my responsibilities between my core rotation and those of my clinic, to which I am obligated to spend time as well.

Sometimes it means missing out on some good learning opportunities due to conflicting schedules. Other times, the days off of one schedule coincide with the days on of another. I can be particularly hit hard if, like today, the day could have been spent sleeping post night shift.

Thankfully these scheduling anomalies are few and far between. However, when I think about how well established the challenges of balance are in residency, having an awareness of these issues can go a long way towards improving resident resilience.

I'm 19 and I'm on the track to becoming an RN. Do you think having nursing experience will help me become a better general surgeon. That's my ultimate goal — Asked by Anonymous

I think that your nursing background gives you a different perspective on health care and that is always to your benefit. Adding new schools of thought into the culture of medicine helps breeds progress and change. It allows others to consider approaching a problem differently. Ultimately that is a good thing.

The Paradox.

The Paradox.

How Do You Cope With Stress?

In my last community survey, I asked how you assess your stress level. The responses demonstrated just how diversely and how uniquely each person’s stress manifests.

This time, I would like to ask a follow up question and allow everyone to share how they deal with stress.

Beyond identifying and dealing with the source of the stress, I personally take more time to spend with my wife. I try to sleep earlier to catch up on rest. I take a step back from studying at home and instead take up sketching and drawing again while listening to music to help me relax. At work, I try to meditate during my breaks.

How do you cope with stress? Share your tips with everyone.

Posterior anatomy study of skeletal muscle articulations of the body, hands, and feet by Albinus, 1879.

Posterior anatomy study of skeletal muscle articulations of the body, hands, and feet by Albinus, 1879.

How Do You Gauge Your Stress?

Whenever I am stressed, there are some subjective markers I look at. I find myself more tired, I have a harder time concentrating, and I feel less motivated. 

Objectively however, I also have something to gauge my stress level. I have a tendency towards grinding my teeth at night, a condition known as bruxism. It is brought on by stress and goes away in its absence. The more stress I have, the more I grind my teeth. From inspecting my mouth guard every morning, I get a decent idea of how stressed I am.

So how do you gauge your stress level? Let me know in the comments and discussion below.

Hit him with everything!
When we get desperate with a patient - be it a cardiac arrest, a septic shock, or just outright aggressiveness - this is what the escalation of interventions feels like.

Hit him with everything!

When we get desperate with a patient - be it a cardiac arrest, a septic shock, or just outright aggressiveness - this is what the escalation of interventions feels like.