Cotton Mather, you dog, dam you! I’l inoculate you with this; with a pox to you!
The semi-literate quotation in the title comes from a note attached to a bomb thrown into Cotton Mather’s house in Boston, Massachusetts on 14 November 1721 because of Mather’s public advocacy of the most important healthcare improvement of the colonial American era—smallpox inoculation. 

Map of Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks

The Global Health Program at the Council on Foreign Relations has been tracking news reports since 2008 to produce an interactive map that plots global outbreaks of diseases that are easily prevented by inexpensive and effective vaccines. These diseases include measles, mumps, whooping cough, polio, and rubella.

Today…

…is my last clinical day of medical school.

…is my last day seeing patients before residency.

…is my last day introducing myself to patients as a medical student.

Though I still have a month plus change of classes before school is officially over, I am both excited and terrified of what is to come.

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Sushi Night.
It was the end of a very long day. We had skipped lunch to catch up on our patient load and I was famished. I hopped into my car and proceeded to the nearest restaurant I could find, a sushi joint.
I made a beeline for the take out section and found what I was looking for: a party platter. 
"Do you need chopsticks to go?" asked the cashier.
"Yes, please."
"How many sets?" I paused and pondered. Should I be honest? Just say one? No, I will look like a pig. Just lie to not look desperate.
"Um…four."
She started packing my purchase for my supposed night of fun and games with friends.
Nay, there would be no such thing. Just a stack of study books, sushi, and four sets of chopsticks. 

Sushi Night.

It was the end of a very long day. We had skipped lunch to catch up on our patient load and I was famished. I hopped into my car and proceeded to the nearest restaurant I could find, a sushi joint.

I made a beeline for the take out section and found what I was looking for: a party platter. 

"Do you need chopsticks to go?" asked the cashier.

"Yes, please."

"How many sets?" I paused and pondered. Should I be honest? Just say one? No, I will look like a pig. Just lie to not look desperate.

"Um…four."

She started packing my purchase for my supposed night of fun and games with friends.

Nay, there would be no such thing. Just a stack of study books, sushi, and four sets of chopsticks. 

A Precarious Situation.
James Valentine, 21, was trimming a tree at an awkward angle when the chainsaw he was using kicked back and lodged in his neck, narrowly missing his vital vessels.
The blade sawed into flesh instead of wood. Valentine’s co-workers were able to detach the blade from its motor, but they left the blade and chain where it was — in Valentine, about a quarter of an inch from the carotid artery that supplies blood to the head — and they held the blade in place until emergency responders arrived.
On the ambulance ride to Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Valentine was awake and alert, according to hospital spokeswoman Jennifer Davis.
The hospital’s director of trauma, Dr. Christine Toevs, said the trauma unit had 10 minutes to prepare — to get ready for a man coming up with a chainsaw blade in his neck.

A Precarious Situation.

James Valentine, 21, was trimming a tree at an awkward angle when the chainsaw he was using kicked back and lodged in his neck, narrowly missing his vital vessels.

The blade sawed into flesh instead of wood. Valentine’s co-workers were able to detach the blade from its motor, but they left the blade and chain where it was — in Valentine, about a quarter of an inch from the carotid artery that supplies blood to the head — and they held the blade in place until emergency responders arrived.

On the ambulance ride to Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Valentine was awake and alert, according to hospital spokeswoman Jennifer Davis.

The hospital’s director of trauma, Dr. Christine Toevs, said the trauma unit had 10 minutes to prepare — to get ready for a man coming up with a chainsaw blade in his neck.

Corazón Coraza by Christian Vivanco and Ánfora.

Compact and elegant, it’s the perfect amount of liquid for one or two glasses. This makes the ceramic jug perfect for the home or office and for sharing simple yet intimate moments.

'Heart sock' could replace future implantable defibrillators

Implantable defibrillators and pacemakers have been around since the 1970s, but advances in materials science and 3-D visualization are transforming them from cumbersome life-support tools into streamlined therapies that could be props from Iron Man.

Smart skin patch knows when you need your meds

Researchers from South Korea have laid the groundwork for a dermal patch that not only dispenses medication continuously, but also knows when to stop.

A two-inch long patch made of stretchable nano-material, it can monitor muscle activity and body temperature. Current practical applications for the patch include drug delivery in patients with Parkinson’s disease, where muscle contractions and tremors can trigger medication release.

The researchers hope that in the future, more functions like wireless connectivity for remote monitoring can be achieved as the technology matures. The researchers estimate that the patch will not be ready for consumer use for another five years.

When Services Converge

In one of those unplanned coincidences, two police patrol units, two paramedic crews, and an emergency physician showed up within minutes of each other at the Starbucks I am sitting in. 

It was an interesting sight to see, watching an impromptu gathering unfold where everyone could take a few minutes to sit down, relax, and talk about something else besides business, away from the ruckus of the emergency department before their shifts start.

Is herd immunity a thing? Can vaccinated people get sick? — Asked by Anonymous

Herd immunity exists and it is well documented. In fact, there is a brilliant animation created by the Harvard Medical School that explains this process.

Vaccinations help prime your body to fight off a specific infection. However, it usually takes a few weeks for your body to create a reserve of immune cells for when you next encounter the infection again. Therefore, if you were infected just before or after receiving the vaccine, you might still get sick because the vaccine did not have ample time to provide any protection.

A summary of how vaccines work is available through the CDC.