While Apple may have changed the way we think about smartphones and tablet computing, pioneering the way for a new industry of app design, they are not alone in this market. Following yesterday’s list, here are some resources that are available for your Android. Note that many developers have submitted apps to both marketplaces so there is overlap.
Laboratory
Normal Lab Values: Quick access to the most common laboratory values. There may only be 150 available when you install it but you have the option to add new categories and new lab values.
Acid Plus: A calculator tool that helps tease out the type of acidotic or alkalotic process involved.
Calculators
BiliCalc: Like BiliTool, this tool helps calculate bilirubin levels in neonates and gives recommendations based on the risk stratification of jaundice.
Mediquations Med Calculator: A premium calculator that has a more streamlined design and more comprehensive formulas than Qx Calculate. 
Qx Calculate: A free calculator for many of the formulas and algorithms in medicine including risk calculators and unit conversions.
Pharmaceutical
Lexicomp: The standard for monograph information, this subscription-based app includes routine updates to the drug database for newly added medications and warnings. It includes a drug interactions calculator.
Epocrates: For the free alternative, Epocrates continues to be a favorite among my classmates and attendings. It includes the standard dosing and regimens for medications but offers less detailed information regarding them compared to Lexicomp.
Micromedex: Another decent alternative that is updated regularly with the most recent warnings and medications. There is a basic free form with premium add-ons including the drug interactions tool.
Skyscape RxDrugs: Like the others, this app provides dosing guidelines on thousands of commonly used drugs. It includes nearly 400 integrated weight-based drug dosing calculators. 
Anatomy
Netter’s Atlas of Human Anatomy: While it certainly is not cheap, it is Netter. All of his anatomical plates have been compiled into this app for easy reviewing and learning.
Visual Anatomy: This app takes the Gray’s Anatomy approach and integrates many of the illustrations from Gray’s and supplements it with 3D models.
Clinical
Medscape: A basic app that includes drug interaction calculator, a procedures reference and daily news in the world of medicine.
Skyscape: A free app that includes a number of resources to help with clinical decision making. Designed to be a one-stop shop, you can purchase and subscribe to more features and resources within depending on your needs.
PEPID: A clinical companion tool that provides summary information around conditions, include a brief explanation of the condition, the investigations, differential, and the treatment plan. Written in a concise form for the learner on the go.
UpToDate: The clinical companion tool that is a favourite among the attendings. This subscription-based app comes in both an online or offline version and mirrors the desktop counterpart. Including in-depth review of disease states and clinical pearls surrounding therapy.
Medicine Central: This is an integrated mobile and web reference built specifically for physicians, students, residents, and nurse practitioners. Medicine Central brings you comprehensive point-of-care content on the essentials of diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up for over 700 diseases and disorders in a quick-read format.
Merck Manual Suite: A digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom. This package integrates expert descriptions of diagnosis and management of diseases with an A to Z symptoms guide and an award-winning drug guide.
Eponym: For the medical student, half the battle is learning the language of medicine. Eponyms explains the common and obscure terms and signs of medicine named after their discoverers.
DxSaurus: A differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.
Bugs and Drugs: A reference tool for antimicrobial therapy, the dosing guidelines and the sensitivity tables of all antibiotics.
Oxford Medical Dictionary: Includes definitions for nearly 10,000 terms used in modern medicine. 
Tools
Google Translate: This could be the only tool to help you in a situation where there is a language barrier and no one to translate.
Flashlight: For the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
Evernote: A note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
Drive/Dropbox: A cloud-based service like Drive or Dropbox offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.
Review
EKGdroid: A simple arrhythmia guide, it explains each component of the EKG and the arrhythmia patterns.
Medical Mnemonics: If you learn best with mnemonics, this may be the app for you. Medical Mnemonics puts over 1500 clever acronyms, rhymes, and memory tricks on your Android, on topics ranging from Anatomy and Biochemistry to Pharmacology and Surgery.
MCAT Prep Chem: For the pre-med student who wants to study on the go, this app covers all of the aspects of MCAT prep for general and organic chemistry. All the content is arranged by topic and category for easy navigation.
MCAT Prep Bio:For the pre-med student who wants to study on the go, this app covers all of the aspects of MCAT prep for general, molecular biology, genetics etc. All the content is arranged by topic and category for easy navigation.
USMLE World QBank: For the medical student preparing for exams, the QBank is an important resource to have.
This list is by no means exhaustive but is a good starting point for readers out there interested in finding medical apps. What apps do you use?

While Apple may have changed the way we think about smartphones and tablet computing, pioneering the way for a new industry of app design, they are not alone in this market. Following yesterday’s list, here are some resources that are available for your Android. Note that many developers have submitted apps to both marketplaces so there is overlap.

Laboratory

  • Normal Lab Values: Quick access to the most common laboratory values. There may only be 150 available when you install it but you have the option to add new categories and new lab values.
  • Acid PlusA calculator tool that helps tease out the type of acidotic or alkalotic process involved.

Calculators

  • BiliCalcLike BiliTool, this tool helps calculate bilirubin levels in neonates and gives recommendations based on the risk stratification of jaundice.
  • Mediquations Med CalculatorA premium calculator that has a more streamlined design and more comprehensive formulas than Qx Calculate. 
  • Qx CalculateA free calculator for many of the formulas and algorithms in medicine including risk calculators and unit conversions.

Pharmaceutical

  • LexicompThe standard for monograph information, this subscription-based app includes routine updates to the drug database for newly added medications and warnings. It includes a drug interactions calculator.
  • EpocratesFor the free alternative, Epocrates continues to be a favorite among my classmates and attendings. It includes the standard dosing and regimens for medications but offers less detailed information regarding them compared to Lexicomp.
  • MicromedexAnother decent alternative that is updated regularly with the most recent warnings and medications. There is a basic free form with premium add-ons including the drug interactions tool.
  • Skyscape RxDrugsLike the others, this app provides dosing guidelines on thousands of commonly used drugs. It includes nearly 400 integrated weight-based drug dosing calculators. 

Anatomy

  • Netter’s Atlas of Human Anatomy: While it certainly is not cheap, it is Netter. All of his anatomical plates have been compiled into this app for easy reviewing and learning.
  • Visual Anatomy: This app takes the Gray’s Anatomy approach and integrates many of the illustrations from Gray’s and supplements it with 3D models.

Clinical

  • MedscapeA basic app that includes drug interaction calculator, a procedures reference and daily news in the world of medicine.
  • SkyscapeA free app that includes a number of resources to help with clinical decision making. Designed to be a one-stop shop, you can purchase and subscribe to more features and resources within depending on your needs.
  • PEPIDA clinical companion tool that provides summary information around conditions, include a brief explanation of the condition, the investigations, differential, and the treatment plan. Written in a concise form for the learner on the go.
  • UpToDateThe clinical companion tool that is a favourite among the attendings. This subscription-based app comes in both an online or offline version and mirrors the desktop counterpart. Including in-depth review of disease states and clinical pearls surrounding therapy.
  • Medicine Central: This is an integrated mobile and web reference built specifically for physicians, students, residents, and nurse practitioners. Medicine Central brings you comprehensive point-of-care content on the essentials of diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up for over 700 diseases and disorders in a quick-read format.
  • Merck Manual SuiteA digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom. This package integrates expert descriptions of diagnosis and management of diseases with an A to Z symptoms guide and an award-winning drug guide.
  • EponymFor the medical student, half the battle is learning the language of medicine. Eponyms explains the common and obscure terms and signs of medicine named after their discoverers.
  • DxSaurusA differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.
  • Bugs and DrugsA reference tool for antimicrobial therapy, the dosing guidelines and the sensitivity tables of all antibiotics.
  • Oxford Medical Dictionary: Includes definitions for nearly 10,000 terms used in modern medicine. 

Tools

  • Google Translate: This could be the only tool to help you in a situation where there is a language barrier and no one to translate.
  • FlashlightFor the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
  • EvernoteA note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
  • Drive/DropboxA cloud-based service like Drive or Dropbox offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.

Review

  • EKGdroid: A simple arrhythmia guide, it explains each component of the EKG and the arrhythmia patterns.
  • Medical Mnemonics: If you learn best with mnemonics, this may be the app for you. Medical Mnemonics puts over 1500 clever acronyms, rhymes, and memory tricks on your Android, on topics ranging from Anatomy and Biochemistry to Pharmacology and Surgery.
  • MCAT Prep Chem: For the pre-med student who wants to study on the go, this app covers all of the aspects of MCAT prep for general and organic chemistry. All the content is arranged by topic and category for easy navigation.
  • MCAT Prep Bio:For the pre-med student who wants to study on the go, this app covers all of the aspects of MCAT prep for general, molecular biology, genetics etc. All the content is arranged by topic and category for easy navigation.
  • USMLE World QBankFor the medical student preparing for exams, the QBank is an important resource to have.

This list is by no means exhaustive but is a good starting point for readers out there interested in finding medical apps. What apps do you use?

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    I needed app ideas for my phone.
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    if you aren’t doctor, try to use this too, somehow it helps :)

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