Posts tagged art is in the anatomy

Laryngoscopy.
A view through a rigid laryngoscope at the voice box. Imagine looking straight down the body from above, with the top of the image being the front, and the bottom the back of your throat. 
Anatomical landmarks visible here include from front to back:
Valeculla
Epiglottis
Vestibular folds (false cords)
Vocal folds (true cords)
Arytenoid cartilage
Pyriform fossa
Tracheal rings

Laryngoscopy.

A view through a rigid laryngoscope at the voice box. Imagine looking straight down the body from above, with the top of the image being the front, and the bottom the back of your throat. 

Anatomical landmarks visible here include from front to back:

  • Valeculla
  • Epiglottis
  • Vestibular folds (false cords)
  • Vocal folds (true cords)
  • Arytenoid cartilage
  • Pyriform fossa
  • Tracheal rings
 Cranial Nerve VII.
Lacrimal gland
Pterogopalatine ganglion
Motor nucleus of cranial nerve VII
Superior salivatory (lacrimal) nucleus
Nucleus solitarius (rostral gustatory portion)
Spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve
Internal acoustic meatus
Stylomastoid foramen
Petrotympanic fissure (chorda tympani nerve)
Submandibular ganglion
Submandibular gland
Sublingual gland
Six branches of cranial nerve VII of head and neck expression
Temporal nerve: Frontalis muscle
Zygomatic nerve: Orbicularis oculi muscle
Buccal nerve: Buccinator and orbicularis oris muscle
Marginal mandibular nerve: Orbicularis oris muscle
Cervical nerve: Platysma muscle
Posterior auricular nerve: Occipitalis muscle

 Cranial Nerve VII.

  1. Lacrimal gland
  2. Pterogopalatine ganglion
  3. Motor nucleus of cranial nerve VII
  4. Superior salivatory (lacrimal) nucleus
  5. Nucleus solitarius (rostral gustatory portion)
  6. Spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve
  7. Internal acoustic meatus
  8. Stylomastoid foramen
  9. Petrotympanic fissure (chorda tympani nerve)
  10. Submandibular ganglion
  11. Submandibular gland
  12. Sublingual gland

Six branches of cranial nerve VII of head and neck expression

  1. Temporal nerve: Frontalis muscle
  2. Zygomatic nerve: Orbicularis oculi muscle
  3. Buccal nerve: Buccinator and orbicularis oris muscle
  4. Marginal mandibular nerve: Orbicularis oris muscle
  5. Cervical nerve: Platysma muscle
  6. Posterior auricular nerve: Occipitalis muscle
Facial Innervation by Region.
Ophthalmic area
Maxillary area
Mandibular area
Cervical nerves area
Superficial cervical plexus area

Facial Innervation by Region.

  1. Ophthalmic area
  2. Maxillary area
  3. Mandibular area
  4. Cervical nerves area
  5. Superficial cervical plexus area
Formaldehyde Makes Me Hungry by Sean Mutchnik.
"One of the strongest memories I have from Gross Anatomy lab as a first year medical student is the disturbing appetite that builds as you handle raw, human flesh…"
That sounds about right.

Formaldehyde Makes Me Hungry by Sean Mutchnik.

"One of the strongest memories I have from Gross Anatomy lab as a first year medical student is the disturbing appetite that builds as you handle raw, human flesh…"

That sounds about right.

Plate XXII: Lymph vessels of the head, trunk and arm, forearm and hand from Handbuch der Anatomie des Menschen (1841) by Dr. Carl Ernest Bock.

Plate XXII: Lymph vessels of the head, trunk and arm, forearm and hand from Handbuch der Anatomie des Menschen (1841) by Dr. Carl Ernest Bock.

Wound Man circa 1400s.

Before medical anatomical studies flourished in the Renaissance period, the physician had a Wound Man diagram. First appearing in European surgical texts of the Middle Ages, it was a schematic diagram that outlined the various wounds a person might suffer in battle or in accidents and served as a quick reference for treatment approaches.

Figure 3 by Heather Lins.

With its eco-friendly materials and retro illustration feel, Heather Lins has created a perfect pillow for any anatomy geek. 

Spine Vodka by Johannes Schulz.

Designed by Hamburg-based designer Johannes Schulz, the concept of a clearly visible backbone to this vodka is meant to represent a drink that has nothing to hide. Brilliant look and creative design.

Histology Dessert Plates by Emily Evans.

I always thought that histology was one of the more interesting laboratory courses we had to take. Unless we went into something like medical laboratory sciences or pathology, we most likely would never look under a microscope again; that is a shame, considering how beautiful histological slices can be.

Self-Portrait by Angela Palmer.

The exhibition that the two pieces (above) were a part of is entitled Inside Out: Body Imaging Sculptures by Angela Palmer.

The technique of using multiple sheets of glass to recreate the body was inspired by the model showing the structure of penicillin created in the 1940s by the Nobel Prize-winning scientist, Dorothy Hodgkin. This extraordinary object was transfixing to Palmer: thick, black contour lines formed a visually stunning three-dimensional map of the structure of penicillin. The contours depict the lines of electron density and show the positions of individual atoms in the penicillin structure. Palmer was fascinated by how an object of the utmost simplicity—put together with a few sheets of Perspex and industrial nuts—could demonstrate a subject of the utmost complexity.

At the time Palmer discovered Hodgkin’s model, she was drawing cadavers in the Medical Sciences department of Oxford University as part of her undergraduate course at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. It struck her that if she drew details of the slices of cadavers onto multiple sheets of glass and presented them on a vertical plane, then the internal architecture of the body could be shown three-dimensionally.