Posts tagged brain

A Brain is for Eating by Dan and Amelia Jacobs, illustrated by Scott Brundage.

Given the spirit of the season, here is a playfully twisted zombie children’s book that, in the authors’ words, “teaches the little walking dead how to find and enjoy their next meal.”

Since I had to counsel someone on their dietary preferences today, I think it is fitting to include the zombified food pyramid.

The book can be ordered online at Amazon or as an eBook.

Harpoon Pierces Man's Skull in Cleaning Accident, Doesn't Damage Brain

Despite accidentally shooting himself in the face with a speargun last week, Bruno Barcellos de Souza Coutinho of Brazil will somehow manage to leave the hospital with his brain intact.

This man lost the vision in his left eye when the harpoon penetrated the eyeball but beyond that and a bit of “negligible brain trauma,” he is set to make a full recovery. And hopefully he has learned a valuable lesson:

Make sure that a weapon is not loaded before you proceed to cleaning it.

This has been a public safety announcement.

Bringing Light created by Bert Klasey, Chris Baron & James Allen Smith for Focus Forward Films.

We often draw our inspirations from nature. It allows us to see things differently, to try new approaches, to think outside the box. In this case, researchers are looking to make brain tumours more visible for surgery through the use of fluorescence-labeled scorpion toxin. Read more here.

Labyrinth Mind.
As part of my efforts to refresh this blog for the next two years, I have gone ahead and created a new logo to replace the old one. Titled the Labyrinth Mind, I feel that this is a more accurate representation of the road ahead. Not only that, drawn from a bottom-up perspective, the brain is also represented a bit more anatomical accuracy, something that always bothered me about the original logo.
Feedback is of course welcome in the comments.

Labyrinth Mind.

As part of my efforts to refresh this blog for the next two years, I have gone ahead and created a new logo to replace the old one. Titled the Labyrinth Mind, I feel that this is a more accurate representation of the road ahead. Not only that, drawn from a bottom-up perspective, the brain is also represented a bit more anatomical accuracy, something that always bothered me about the original logo.

Feedback is of course welcome in the comments.

Development of the Human Embryonic Brain from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

We were shown this video in class as part of a lecture on the biology of learning and memory. No matter how you look at it, it is impressive how much the brain grows in size, swelling with newly formed neurones who spread their fingerlike synapses impulsively through the far corners of the neurological system.

The Human Brain.
When I hold the brain in my hand, I cannot help but wonder at the infinite layers of intricacies and complexities contained within it. Million upon millions of axon tracts firing impulses to every corner of the brain and conversely receiving signals from them, listening and communicating, analyzing and deciding, give us conscience, reason and bodily regulation. And to think that this powerful computational engine is simultaneously the same and different within all of us humbles me.

The Human Brain.

When I hold the brain in my hand, I cannot help but wonder at the infinite layers of intricacies and complexities contained within it. Million upon millions of axon tracts firing impulses to every corner of the brain and conversely receiving signals from them, listening and communicating, analyzing and deciding, give us conscience, reason and bodily regulation. And to think that this powerful computational engine is simultaneously the same and different within all of us humbles me.

The Love Competition by Brent Hoff and the Stanford Center for Cognitive and Neurobiological Imaging.

The brain is an organ of understanding, of functioning, and of expression. Within its infinite shades of complexity, we can all find it within ourselves to emote. In this first annual competition being held at the Stanford Center for Cognitive and Neurobiological Imaging, they pose the question: can one person love someone more than another?

Seven contestant ages 10 through 75 took part, spending five minutes in the fMRI thinking about love. 

The scanning begins at 8:40 for those who do not want to listen to the contestants’ love stories in the video’s introduction.

Like one of the competitors says, I have found that my love and affection for my partner have only deepened and evolved since we first began nearly five years ago. Our love has taken on new shapes and new forms. While the relationship has been and will be in the next few years challenging for the both of us, it is not because of conflict or differences, but rather the long distance nature of our current relation. The physical separation has forced us into tough situations, made us more understanding, and in turn strengthened our love for one another. I cannot wait to see her soon.

Have you ever felt love? Discuss here.

Thanks to cthai2 for sharing this with me.

Brain Stress. Stress Brain.
The nine-week, neurology block is officially at an end. But it is not the end; it is only the beginning. With a little over two months left in this term, the challenge is now to go back and study it all, section by section, week by week. And crucially, remember.
I better squeeze the stress brain a few more times for good measure.

Brain Stress. Stress Brain.

The nine-week, neurology block is officially at an end. But it is not the end; it is only the beginning. With a little over two months left in this term, the challenge is now to go back and study it all, section by section, week by week. And crucially, remember.

I better squeeze the stress brain a few more times for good measure.

Brain by Federico Carbajal.

Nine weeks of neuroanatomy is quickly coming to an end. For a long time, the material from week to week seemed to just blur together, a continuum that had no start or finish. Our brains felt stuck in limbo as we delved deeper and deeper into brain and behaviour. It is almost surreal that we are almost done covering this juggernaut of a block. Now comes the hard part though: studying it all for the exam.

Head II by Lisa Nilsson.
Only six weeks have elapsed in our brain and behaviour curriculum, a block that spans more than two months. The tracts, nuclei, cortices, and association areas are all blurring together. It is a lot to wrap our heads around. Many of us are trying novel approaches to make the studying more understandable, the information more digestible, and time better spent. It is a block that challenges us on all fronts. Welcome to the jungle.

Head II by Lisa Nilsson.

Only six weeks have elapsed in our brain and behaviour curriculum, a block that spans more than two months. The tracts, nuclei, cortices, and association areas are all blurring together. It is a lot to wrap our heads around. Many of us are trying novel approaches to make the studying more understandable, the information more digestible, and time better spent. It is a block that challenges us on all fronts. Welcome to the jungle.