Posts tagged brain and behaviour

Please Recharge by Christopher David Ryan.
Day One: Society and Ethics
Day Two: OSCE
Day Three: Neuroanatomy, Gross Anatomy, and Histology
Day Four: Pathology, Integument, Clinical Skills, and Family Practice
Day Five: Neurology
Day Six: Reproduction and Growth & Development
Today’s exam probably turned out better than I imagined. It was a hard but fair exam, one that weighed heavily on the clinical side. Questions that required pinpointing the whereabouts of brain lesions based solely on the patient presentation were peppered throughout the 20-page exam booklet. They were time consuming to work through and were by far the most challenging. 
Now, having finished with the Beast, it is time to refocus on my last two blocks. But firstly, a nap.

Please Recharge by Christopher David Ryan.

  • Day One: Society and Ethics
  • Day Two: OSCE
  • Day Three: Neuroanatomy, Gross Anatomy, and Histology
  • Day Four: Pathology, Integument, Clinical Skills, and Family Practice
  • Day Five: Neurology
  • Day Six: Reproduction and Growth & Development

Today’s exam probably turned out better than I imagined. It was a hard but fair exam, one that weighed heavily on the clinical side. Questions that required pinpointing the whereabouts of brain lesions based solely on the patient presentation were peppered throughout the 20-page exam booklet. They were time consuming to work through and were by far the most challenging. 

Now, having finished with the Beast, it is time to refocus on my last two blocks. But firstly, a nap.

The Love Competition by Brent Hoff and the Stanford Center for Cognitive and Neurobiological Imaging.

The brain is an organ of understanding, of functioning, and of expression. Within its infinite shades of complexity, we can all find it within ourselves to emote. In this first annual competition being held at the Stanford Center for Cognitive and Neurobiological Imaging, they pose the question: can one person love someone more than another?

Seven contestant ages 10 through 75 took part, spending five minutes in the fMRI thinking about love. 

The scanning begins at 8:40 for those who do not want to listen to the contestants’ love stories in the video’s introduction.

Like one of the competitors says, I have found that my love and affection for my partner have only deepened and evolved since we first began nearly five years ago. Our love has taken on new shapes and new forms. While the relationship has been and will be in the next few years challenging for the both of us, it is not because of conflict or differences, but rather the long distance nature of our current relation. The physical separation has forced us into tough situations, made us more understanding, and in turn strengthened our love for one another. I cannot wait to see her soon.

Have you ever felt love? Discuss here.

Thanks to cthai2 for sharing this with me.

Brain Stress. Stress Brain.
The nine-week, neurology block is officially at an end. But it is not the end; it is only the beginning. With a little over two months left in this term, the challenge is now to go back and study it all, section by section, week by week. And crucially, remember.
I better squeeze the stress brain a few more times for good measure.

Brain Stress. Stress Brain.

The nine-week, neurology block is officially at an end. But it is not the end; it is only the beginning. With a little over two months left in this term, the challenge is now to go back and study it all, section by section, week by week. And crucially, remember.

I better squeeze the stress brain a few more times for good measure.

Brain by Federico Carbajal.

Nine weeks of neuroanatomy is quickly coming to an end. For a long time, the material from week to week seemed to just blur together, a continuum that had no start or finish. Our brains felt stuck in limbo as we delved deeper and deeper into brain and behaviour. It is almost surreal that we are almost done covering this juggernaut of a block. Now comes the hard part though: studying it all for the exam.

In the everyday world, you don’t see the people who end up on psychiatric in-patient units, or at least you don’t see them sick … I saw a man brought in for treatment because he had been found in his kitchen, holding his wife’s bloody heart in his hands, a carving knife beside him on the floor. I remember a woman, a graduate student in comparative literature in one of the best schools in the country, with long, golden hair. But she hunched over with her hair across her face and her misery was so palpable that my throat choked up as if I would cry.

Most people who end up in a psychiatric hospital are deeply unhappy and seriously disturbed, and many of them lead lives of humiliation and great pain … It used to be fashionable to say that madness didn’t really exist at all, that it had been created when society’s quest for order defined some people as deviant. Grand sociologic theories claimed that psychiatry punished those who were merely eccentric or unconventional. Madness is real, and it is an act of moral cowardice to treat it as a romantic freedom.
Tanya Marie Luhrmann, “Of Two Minds.”

Brain Surgery by That Mitchell and Webb Look.

A friend of mine showed this to me for a good laugh. A turn of phrase is the centrepiece of this sketch that just so happens to coincide with our current neurology block. What makes it great is the punchline that you just know is coming when the last guest shows up. Priceless.

Head II by Lisa Nilsson.
Only six weeks have elapsed in our brain and behaviour curriculum, a block that spans more than two months. The tracts, nuclei, cortices, and association areas are all blurring together. It is a lot to wrap our heads around. Many of us are trying novel approaches to make the studying more understandable, the information more digestible, and time better spent. It is a block that challenges us on all fronts. Welcome to the jungle.

Head II by Lisa Nilsson.

Only six weeks have elapsed in our brain and behaviour curriculum, a block that spans more than two months. The tracts, nuclei, cortices, and association areas are all blurring together. It is a lot to wrap our heads around. Many of us are trying novel approaches to make the studying more understandable, the information more digestible, and time better spent. It is a block that challenges us on all fronts. Welcome to the jungle.

A Report on Visual Agnosia

Excerpt from “The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat" by Oliver Sacks: 

I had stopped at a florist on my way to his apartment and bought myself an extravagant red rose for my buttonhole. Now I removed this and handed it to him. He took it like a botanist or morphologist given a specimen, not like a person given a flower.

"About six inches in length," he commented. "A convoluted red form with a linear green attachment." "Yes," I said encouragingly, "and what do you think it is, Dr P.?”

"Not easy to say." He seemed perplexed. "It lacks the simple symmetry of the Platonic solids, although it may have a higher symmetry of its own. …I think this could be an inflorescence or flower."

"Could be?" I queried

"Could be," he confirmed.

"Smell it," I suggested, and he again looked somewhat puzzled, as if I had asked him to smell a higher symmetry. But he complied courteously, and took it to his nose. Now, suddenly, he came to life. "Beautiful!" he exclaimed. "An early rose. What a heavenly smell!" He started to hum "Die Rose, die Lilie …

Reality, it seemed, might be conveyed by smell, not by sight.

The Divided Brain by Iain McGilchrist.

An interesting segment about the differences between the two hemispheres of our brain and in McGilchrist’s observation, how that difference has influenced society, culture and human behaviour.

He makes the case that human beings are predominantly left-hemisphere dominant. Within neuroanatomy, the dominant half is attributed to where our speech centres are most active. In right-handed people, over 90% have these language areas in the left hemisphere; in left-handed people, 70% are also left-hemisphere dominant. The brain is a truly fascinating organ, one who’s secrets we have not yet completely unlocked. A true final frontier.

In a large artery acute ischemic stroke…

2 million neurones;

14 billion synapses;

12 kilometres of myelinated fibres;

Are destroyed each minute.