Posts tagged discussion

Replies to Review: LAMY Safari

  • Pendere: My pen of choice. I use a Lamy Safari Vista, which is fully transparent so that I can see where I stand ink-wise and refill in advance.
  • I have to check the tiny window on opposite sides of my pen that allow me to see how much ink remains. Generally once it appears empty, there is about 20% left in the converter.
  • Ashenmemories: Agreed. The Safari is pretty durable and a smooth writer for a reasonable price as far as fountain pens go. Have you thought about turning any of the disposables into eye dropper pens? You wouldn’t have to worry about ink as much while at work.
  • I have not thought about it but perhaps that can be a future project of mine. I am actually considering getting another fountain pen for a different purpose at the moment. Perhaps I can shed some light on that if I get a chance to review it.
  • Rarelyposts: Resisting the urge to buy, but slowly losing…
  • Resistance is futile. In all seriousness, if you have thought about getting into fountain pens, I think this would be a decent one to start with. There is an investment up front - there are definitely cheaper pens out there - but it was built as a trainer and it writes fantastic.
  • Wayfaringmd: Only a doctor could write such a thorough review of a pen.
  • I should have become a dermatologist then. Then I could apply that level of scrutiny to a mole. I kid. I kid.

How Do You Gauge Your Stress?

Whenever I am stressed, there are some subjective markers I look at. I find myself more tired, I have a harder time concentrating, and I feel less motivated. 

Objectively however, I also have something to gauge my stress level. I have a tendency towards grinding my teeth at night, a condition known as bruxism. It is brought on by stress and goes away in its absence. The more stress I have, the more I grind my teeth. From inspecting my mouth guard every morning, I get a decent idea of how stressed I am.

So how do you gauge your stress level? Let me know in the comments and discussion below.

Is the Quest to Build a Kinder, Gentler Surgeon Misguided?

I thought that this was an interesting article and would be interested to know what others think of this dichotomy. Can one maintain the hard edge needed to practice at their peak when the training emphasizes a softer touch? Can one be malleable, capable of being both at the same time?

Mailbag

I have been very busy over the past few weeks and have since had a amassed a pack of questions in my inbox waiting to be answered. This is about the first half of the questions that I have. The remainder will follow in a subsequent mailbag. I apologize for the delay.

Exercise: Superpowers

I was recently asked a similar question during an interview and I think it would be a fun exercise for everyone to switch gears and let your creativity run wild. Leave your answer below or in the comments section.

If you could be a superhero, what superpower would you have?

Exercise: Describe Yourself

I was reviewing some practice interview questions and one question caught my eye. I thought it was simple but challenging, interesting enough a question for the readers to ponder. Leave your answers below or in the comments section.

Q: If your friends were to describe you, what five words would they use?

Question-asker, another opinion: your med student girlfriend probably does enough medicine at school, and would appreciate a non-medical gift! Something to read, a way to relax, a weekend away, a nice meal... — Asked by drosometer

That is probably a good point. A little reprieve from medicine is always a nice touch. You really can go both ways on this.

(With regards to this question).

Reader Responses: If You Were A Doctor.
So after a hundred responses, I categorized everyone’s answers into the following chart. It would appear that most readers want to be some sort of surgeon or internal medicine sub-specialist.
I wanted to take a moment to discuss surgery, not to dissuade but to inform, as it was slowly dawned on us as we entered medical school.
Throughout the country, surgery appears to be the leading career interest for medical students. There is however a growing discrepancy between the number of graduate surgeons we produce and the number of positions that are available. Part of the reason is the economic downturn and the delayed retirement of surgeons; other contributors include the issues of expanded surgery residencies and even political factors. When 30 surgeons must compete for a single position, that is a serious problem.
For many, the salvation is in doing locums for established physicians or to pursue fellowships to brave the drought. The dwindling positions only became a evident within the last few years, long before the current batch of residents would have graduated.
Perhaps in a few more years, the field will open up again. Only time will tell. For now, the reality does not conform with expectation.
As one surgeon described it to me: “The golden age to be a surgeon has passed.”

Reader Responses: If You Were A Doctor.

So after a hundred responses, I categorized everyone’s answers into the following chart. It would appear that most readers want to be some sort of surgeon or internal medicine sub-specialist.

I wanted to take a moment to discuss surgery, not to dissuade but to inform, as it was slowly dawned on us as we entered medical school.

Throughout the country, surgery appears to be the leading career interest for medical students. There is however a growing discrepancy between the number of graduate surgeons we produce and the number of positions that are available. Part of the reason is the economic downturn and the delayed retirement of surgeons; other contributors include the issues of expanded surgery residencies and even political factors. When 30 surgeons must compete for a single position, that is a serious problem.

For many, the salvation is in doing locums for established physicians or to pursue fellowships to brave the drought. The dwindling positions only became a evident within the last few years, long before the current batch of residents would have graduated.

Perhaps in a few more years, the field will open up again. Only time will tell. For now, the reality does not conform with expectation.

As one surgeon described it to me: “The golden age to be a surgeon has passed.”