Posts tagged funny

Xanax from New in Town by John Mulaney.

Over the weekend, I discovered this hilarious bit by comedian John Mulaney about trying to procure Xanax and it still makes me grin. I would recommend listening to some of his other material as well.

The Matching Conspiracy.

When you think about the whole interviewing experience, it really is analogous to online dating. You sign on, read the profile the residency programs have created, and write your own in turn. Only after each has written and read each other’s profiles, do you all agree to a blind date. You meet for the first time and each party has thirty minutes to figure out if the other is the the one they have been looking for.

Anyone who has read this blog for a length of time knows that I love typography. The Canadian Residency Matching service (CaRMS) happened to use one of my favourite typefaces called Gill Sans. But where have I seen that typeface before.

Hm…

Right! eHarmony.

Coincidence? I think not. Dare I say they may be one and the same company? The plot thickens…

As Horatio would say: “The writing is on the wall.”

Where did he even get that font?!
Sometimes, a poorly legible note is only made worse when it is scanned into the computer. Detail is lost, the writing is faded, and what may have been semi-legible is completely incomprehensible. Welcome to first world medical problems.

Where did he even get that font?!

Sometimes, a poorly legible note is only made worse when it is scanned into the computer. Detail is lost, the writing is faded, and what may have been semi-legible is completely incomprehensible. Welcome to first world medical problems.

Inspired by a “stress reduction kit” I saw at my preceptor’s office, I decided to draft a silly stress reduction kit of my own, one that probably is more in line with how stress can feel like sometimes for a student.

Inspired by a “stress reduction kit” I saw at my preceptor’s office, I decided to draft a silly stress reduction kit of my own, one that probably is more in line with how stress can feel like sometimes for a student.

The last I remembered, the heart is not just some organ that inconveniently divides your lungs in two. It seemed pretty important.
A cardiologist.
Patient exhibits a classic Arrow sign on chest radiograph.
A resident’s half joking description of what and where, if any, abnormalities are on a plain film chest x-ray.

A Brain is for Eating by Dan and Amelia Jacobs, illustrated by Scott Brundage.

Given the spirit of the season, here is a playfully twisted zombie children’s book that, in the authors’ words, “teaches the little walking dead how to find and enjoy their next meal.”

Since I had to counsel someone on their dietary preferences today, I think it is fitting to include the zombified food pyramid.

The book can be ordered online at Amazon or as an eBook.

It’s a virus!

The caped crusader has stepped up to the challenge of medicine to defend against inappropriate antibiotic use. It is the treatment we want but not the one we need right now.

It’s a virus!

The caped crusader has stepped up to the challenge of medicine to defend against inappropriate antibiotic use. It is the treatment we want but not the one we need right now.

The Art of Pimping by Dr. Detsky

The term “pimping” was popularized by Brancati in 1989. As he defined it, pimping occurs when an attending physician (the Pimper) poses a series of difficult questions to a resident or medical student (the Pimpee). Pimping usually occurs in settings such as “morning report” or “attending rounds,” in which trainees at various levels convene with a faculty member to review patients currently under their care. Among surgeons, pimping may occur when students and residents are a captive audience observing a patient undergoing an operation. Brancati described the origins of the term, which date back to 17th-century London. Koch’s series of “Pümpfrage” (pimp questions) were used on his rounds in the 19th century. The practice migrated to North America in the 20th century and was documented by Flexner while observing Osler making rounds at Johns Hopkins. Brancati outlined suggestions for attending physicians to further hone their pimping skills and methods for students to defend themselves from it. He posited that the art of pimping would disappear in the future with increased specialization and educational reorganization. This commentary revisits the art of pimping 20 years later and provides an update for faculty members and students alike on modern methods in this important skill.

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