Posts tagged iOS

Medical Apps: Reply

  • Neppto: Which smartphone do you think is the best for clinical stuff?
  • I think that right now from both a quantity and quality standpoint, Apple is still the best platform for medical professionals. It came to the market first and has the most developer support. Android has the largest market share worldwide and that cannot be ignored but the development cycle is fractured because there is such a variety of devices, hardware capabilities and operating system versions. Support for Android will improve over time but those issues will continue to be a barrier to entry for many companies hoping to reach the widest audience.
As the popularity of smartphone of tablet computing expands, so too does the library of apps. The following is a list of iOS apps that might be of interest or use for the curious, for the learners, and for the clerks.
Laboratory
LabDx: A reference tool for common laboratory investigations.
Acid Plus: A calculator tool that helps tease out the type of acidotic or alkalotic process involved.
Lytes: A basic reference to the common electrolyte abnormalities, the causes, signs, and symptoms.
Calculators
BiliTool: An online tool that has an optimized mobile format, this tool helps calculate bilirubin levels in neonates and gives recommendations based on the risk stratification of jaundice.
Qx Calculate: A free calculator for many of the formulas and algorithms in medicine including risk calculators and unit conversions.
MedCalc Pro: A premium calculator that has a more streamlined design and more formulas than Qx Calculate. It also allows you to save patient values for use in multiple calculations.
Pharmaceutical
Lexicomp: The standard for monograph information, this subscription-based app includes routine updates to the drug database for newly added medications and warnings. It includes a drug interactions calculator.
Epocrates: For the free alternative, Epocrates continues to be a favorite among my classmates and attendings. It includes the standard dosing and regimens for medications but offers less detailed information regarding them compared to Lexicomp.
Micromedex: Another decent alternative that is updated regularly with the most recent warnings and medications. There is a basic free form with premium add-ons including the drug interactions tool.
Anatomy
Netter’s Anatomy Atlas: Netter is a household name in the world of medical illustrations and all of his anatomical plates have been compiled in this app. A good quick reference of study tool.
Pocket Anatomy/Essential Anatomy: Moving into the third dimension, these two apps despite a premium price, a useful study tool for anyone interested in medicine.
Muscle System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see muscles in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
Skeleton System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see bones in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
Brain and Nervous System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see nerves in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
Radiology
Radiology 2.0: One Night in the ED: A case-based radiological app that goes through the common presentations with a methodical approach.
Clinical
Medscape: A basic app that includes drug interaction calculator, a procedures reference and daily news in the world of medicine.
Skyscape: A free app that includes a number of resources to help with clinical decision making. Designed to be a one-stop shop, you can purchase and subscribe to more features and resources within depending on your needs.
Eponyms: For the medical student, half the battle is learning the language of medicine. Eponyms explains the common and obscure terms and signs of medicine named after their discoverers. 
Bugs and Drugs: A reference tool for antimicrobial therapy, the dosing guidelines and the sensitivity tables of all antibiotics.
PEPID: A clinical companion tool that provides summary information around conditions, include a brief explanation of the condition, the investigations, differential, and the treatment plan. Written in a concise form for the learner on the go.
UpToDate: The clinical companion tool that is a favourite among the attendings. This subscription-based app comes in both an online or offline version and mirrors the desktop counterpart. Including in-depth review of disease states and clinical pearls surrounding therapy.
DxSaurus: A differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.
Reference
The Merck Manual: Professional Edition: A digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom.
Toronto Notes 2012: While not exactly an app, this textbook is an excellent reference for any medical student and is one that I read during quiet moments on shift. A digital copy of this textbook stays with me in my eBooks library.
Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine: This is also not an app but an eBook. An excellent reference for internal medicine, it offers great deal of information and clinical pearls for the hospitalist. 
Tools
Google Translate: For the moments where language is a barrier, this could be the only useful way to gather patient information.
Flashlight: For the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
Evernote: A note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
Drive/Dropbox: A cloud-based service like Drive or Dropbox offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.
Review
USMLE World QBank: For the medical student preparing for exams, the QBank is an important resource to have.
This list is by no means exhaustive but is a good starting point for readers out there interested in finding medical apps. What apps do you use?

As the popularity of smartphone of tablet computing expands, so too does the library of apps. The following is a list of iOS apps that might be of interest or use for the curious, for the learners, and for the clerks.

Laboratory

  • LabDx: A reference tool for common laboratory investigations.
  • Acid Plus: A calculator tool that helps tease out the type of acidotic or alkalotic process involved.
  • Lytes: A basic reference to the common electrolyte abnormalities, the causes, signs, and symptoms.

Calculators

  • BiliTool: An online tool that has an optimized mobile format, this tool helps calculate bilirubin levels in neonates and gives recommendations based on the risk stratification of jaundice.
  • Qx Calculate: A free calculator for many of the formulas and algorithms in medicine including risk calculators and unit conversions.
  • MedCalc Pro: A premium calculator that has a more streamlined design and more formulas than Qx Calculate. It also allows you to save patient values for use in multiple calculations.

Pharmaceutical

  • Lexicomp: The standard for monograph information, this subscription-based app includes routine updates to the drug database for newly added medications and warnings. It includes a drug interactions calculator.
  • Epocrates: For the free alternative, Epocrates continues to be a favorite among my classmates and attendings. It includes the standard dosing and regimens for medications but offers less detailed information regarding them compared to Lexicomp.
  • Micromedex: Another decent alternative that is updated regularly with the most recent warnings and medications. There is a basic free form with premium add-ons including the drug interactions tool.

Anatomy

  • Netter’s Anatomy Atlas: Netter is a household name in the world of medical illustrations and all of his anatomical plates have been compiled in this app. A good quick reference of study tool.
  • Pocket Anatomy/Essential Anatomy: Moving into the third dimension, these two apps despite a premium price, a useful study tool for anyone interested in medicine.
  • Muscle System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see muscles in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
  • Skeleton System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see bones in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
  • Brain and Nervous System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see nerves in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.

Radiology

  • Radiology 2.0: One Night in the ED: A case-based radiological app that goes through the common presentations with a methodical approach.

Clinical

  • Medscape: A basic app that includes drug interaction calculator, a procedures reference and daily news in the world of medicine.
  • Skyscape: A free app that includes a number of resources to help with clinical decision making. Designed to be a one-stop shop, you can purchase and subscribe to more features and resources within depending on your needs.
  • Eponyms: For the medical student, half the battle is learning the language of medicine. Eponyms explains the common and obscure terms and signs of medicine named after their discoverers. 
  • Bugs and Drugs: A reference tool for antimicrobial therapy, the dosing guidelines and the sensitivity tables of all antibiotics.
  • PEPID: A clinical companion tool that provides summary information around conditions, include a brief explanation of the condition, the investigations, differential, and the treatment plan. Written in a concise form for the learner on the go.
  • UpToDate: The clinical companion tool that is a favourite among the attendings. This subscription-based app comes in both an online or offline version and mirrors the desktop counterpart. Including in-depth review of disease states and clinical pearls surrounding therapy.
  • DxSaurus: A differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.

Reference

  • The Merck Manual: Professional Edition: A digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom.
  • Toronto Notes 2012: While not exactly an app, this textbook is an excellent reference for any medical student and is one that I read during quiet moments on shift. A digital copy of this textbook stays with me in my eBooks library.
  • Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine: This is also not an app but an eBook. An excellent reference for internal medicine, it offers great deal of information and clinical pearls for the hospitalist. 

Tools

  • Google Translate: For the moments where language is a barrier, this could be the only useful way to gather patient information.
  • Flashlight: For the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
  • Evernote: A note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
  • Drive/Dropbox: A cloud-based service like Drive or Dropbox offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.

Review

  • USMLE World QBank: For the medical student preparing for exams, the QBank is an important resource to have.

This list is by no means exhaustive but is a good starting point for readers out there interested in finding medical apps. What apps do you use?

11 Apps for the Medical Student

The recent rise of smartphones and tablets has opened up the doors for new ways we can use technology in our day-to-day lives. From reading news to playing games, it seems that we suddenly have a lot more options and a lot more flexibility.

Medicine has leveraged these advances to make tools and utilities that can take advantage of the new market, where a computer and more importantly the software that is on it has become portable.

Nearing the start of my clinical years, I present to you my list of phone and tablet apps that I currently use or have used in the past that I feel will continue to be useful for any medical student.

Disclaimer: The following apps are all available for iOS. Availability online, on Android, Blackberry, or any other operating system may vary depending on the author of the respective programs.