Posts tagged illustration

Cranial Nerve I: Olfactory Nerve.

Cranial Nerve I: Olfactory Nerve.

Taking a Manual Blood Pressure Reading.
Find the right-sized cuff: The bladder width should be roughly 40% the circumference of the arm; alternatively the bladder length should be roughly 80-100% of the arm circumference. If it is much larger or smaller than this, the reading could be inaccurate.
Line up the arterial line: On the cuff there is a line demarcating where the brachial artery should be. Place this line over the artery, which is located just medial to the biceps tendon. The bladder cuff should be approximately 2-3cm above the antecubital fossa.
First reading: Palpate the radial artery. Inflate the cuff until the radial pulse is obliterated. Remember this reading. Deflate the cuff. 
Second reading: Place the diaphragm of the stethoscope just under the cuff above the brachial artery and reinflate the cuff to 20mmHg above the previous reading. Slowly deflate the cuff at a rate of 2-4mmHg per beat. Listen for the appearance and disappearance of the Korotkoff sounds as turbulent blood flows through the partially occluded artery. 
Korotkoff markers: The first Korotkoff sound that appears (phase I) signals when the pulse pressure is just enough to overcome the external cuff pressure. This is the systolic reading. When there is no sound (phase V), this signals the diastolic reading.
Pre-reading Considerations
Avoid any activities that may affect the blood pressure including but not limited to coffee, smoking, low temperature, stress, or exercise. Pain can also affect blood pressure.
Before taking a measurement, ensure the patient is in a quiet area. Ask if they have gone to the washroom as a full bladder can affect the blood pressure. Make sure they are sitting with their feet touching the floor, not cross-legged. Ensure that the patient has rested for at least 5-10 minutes before taking the reading.

Taking a Manual Blood Pressure Reading.

  1. Find the right-sized cuff: The bladder width should be roughly 40% the circumference of the arm; alternatively the bladder length should be roughly 80-100% of the arm circumference. If it is much larger or smaller than this, the reading could be inaccurate.
  2. Line up the arterial line: On the cuff there is a line demarcating where the brachial artery should be. Place this line over the artery, which is located just medial to the biceps tendon. The bladder cuff should be approximately 2-3cm above the antecubital fossa.
  3. First reading: Palpate the radial artery. Inflate the cuff until the radial pulse is obliterated. Remember this reading. Deflate the cuff. 
  4. Second reading: Place the diaphragm of the stethoscope just under the cuff above the brachial artery and reinflate the cuff to 20mmHg above the previous reading. Slowly deflate the cuff at a rate of 2-4mmHg per beat. Listen for the appearance and disappearance of the Korotkoff sounds as turbulent blood flows through the partially occluded artery. 
  5. Korotkoff markers: The first Korotkoff sound that appears (phase I) signals when the pulse pressure is just enough to overcome the external cuff pressure. This is the systolic reading. When there is no sound (phase V), this signals the diastolic reading.

Pre-reading Considerations

  1. Avoid any activities that may affect the blood pressure including but not limited to coffee, smoking, low temperature, stress, or exercise. Pain can also affect blood pressure.
  2. Before taking a measurement, ensure the patient is in a quiet area. Ask if they have gone to the washroom as a full bladder can affect the blood pressure. Make sure they are sitting with their feet touching the floor, not cross-legged. Ensure that the patient has rested for at least 5-10 minutes before taking the reading.
Plate V from Handbuch der Anatomie des Menschen, 1841 by Dr. Carl Ernest Bock.

Plate V from Handbuch der Anatomie des Menschen, 1841 by Dr. Carl Ernest Bock.

The Paradox.

The Paradox.

Posterior anatomy study of skeletal muscle articulations of the body, hands, and feet by Albinus, 1879.

Posterior anatomy study of skeletal muscle articulations of the body, hands, and feet by Albinus, 1879.

My Gut, My Choice by Alia Rezk.
The game changer of this eternal debate between health nuts and health care providers is C. difficile.
Now that. Changes. Everything.

My Gut, My Choice by Alia Rezk.

The game changer of this eternal debate between health nuts and health care providers is C. difficile.

Now that. Changes. Everything.

Segmental Anatomy of the Liver.
The liver is divided into 8 segments. These are delineated by the 3 hepatic veins, dividing the liver vertically into 4, and then through the horizontal plane for superior and inferior portions.
Posterior (caudal) segment [I]
Lateral segment (lateral superior area) [II]
Left anterior lateral segment (lateral inferior area [III]
Medial segment (medial superior area) [IVa]
Medial segment (medial inferior area) [IVb]
Anterior medial segment (anterior inferior area) [V]
Right anterior lateral segment (posterior inferior area) [VI]
Posterior lateral segment (posterior superior area) [VII]
Posterior medial segment (anterior superior area) [VIII]

Segmental Anatomy of the Liver.

The liver is divided into 8 segments. These are delineated by the 3 hepatic veins, dividing the liver vertically into 4, and then through the horizontal plane for superior and inferior portions.

  • Posterior (caudal) segment [I]
  • Lateral segment (lateral superior area) [II]
  • Left anterior lateral segment (lateral inferior area [III]
  • Medial segment (medial superior area) [IVa]
  • Medial segment (medial inferior area) [IVb]
  • Anterior medial segment (anterior inferior area) [V]
  • Right anterior lateral segment (posterior inferior area) [VI]
  • Posterior lateral segment (posterior superior area) [VII]
  • Posterior medial segment (anterior superior area) [VIII]
I feel warm inside :) by ilovedoodle.

I feel warm inside :) by ilovedoodle.

My First Love by carlvan.

My First Love by carlvan.

INDIGESTION by LuisParamo and BuyoDesign.
Even during routine work ups, imaging studies can reveal the most surprising findings. Free air? Check. No heart silhouette? Check. Pinocchio? Sure, why not.

INDIGESTION by LuisParamo and BuyoDesign.

Even during routine work ups, imaging studies can reveal the most surprising findings. Free air? Check. No heart silhouette? Check. Pinocchio? Sure, why not.