Posts tagged illustration

Body by Andres Diaz.

Body by Andres Diaz.

Why Not Zoidberg? by Barry Doyon.
March 28th was the 15th anniversary of Futurama, one of my all time favourite animated series. In celebration, here is a propaganda poster designed by Barry Doyon featuring our favourite intergalactic crustacean doctor.

Why Not Zoidberg? by Barry Doyon.

March 28th was the 15th anniversary of Futurama, one of my all time favourite animated series. In celebration, here is a propaganda poster designed by Barry Doyon featuring our favourite intergalactic crustacean doctor.

Laryngoscopy.
A view through a rigid laryngoscope at the voice box. Imagine looking straight down the body from above, with the top of the image being the front, and the bottom the back of your throat. 
Anatomical landmarks visible here include from front to back:
Valeculla
Epiglottis
Vestibular folds (false cords)
Vocal folds (true cords)
Arytenoid cartilage
Pyriform fossa
Tracheal rings

Laryngoscopy.

A view through a rigid laryngoscope at the voice box. Imagine looking straight down the body from above, with the top of the image being the front, and the bottom the back of your throat. 

Anatomical landmarks visible here include from front to back:

  • Valeculla
  • Epiglottis
  • Vestibular folds (false cords)
  • Vocal folds (true cords)
  • Arytenoid cartilage
  • Pyriform fossa
  • Tracheal rings
 Cranial Nerve VII.
Lacrimal gland
Pterogopalatine ganglion
Motor nucleus of cranial nerve VII
Superior salivatory (lacrimal) nucleus
Nucleus solitarius (rostral gustatory portion)
Spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve
Internal acoustic meatus
Stylomastoid foramen
Petrotympanic fissure (chorda tympani nerve)
Submandibular ganglion
Submandibular gland
Sublingual gland
Six branches of cranial nerve VII of head and neck expression
Temporal nerve: Frontalis muscle
Zygomatic nerve: Orbicularis oculi muscle
Buccal nerve: Buccinator and orbicularis oris muscle
Marginal mandibular nerve: Orbicularis oris muscle
Cervical nerve: Platysma muscle
Posterior auricular nerve: Occipitalis muscle

 Cranial Nerve VII.

  1. Lacrimal gland
  2. Pterogopalatine ganglion
  3. Motor nucleus of cranial nerve VII
  4. Superior salivatory (lacrimal) nucleus
  5. Nucleus solitarius (rostral gustatory portion)
  6. Spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve
  7. Internal acoustic meatus
  8. Stylomastoid foramen
  9. Petrotympanic fissure (chorda tympani nerve)
  10. Submandibular ganglion
  11. Submandibular gland
  12. Sublingual gland

Six branches of cranial nerve VII of head and neck expression

  1. Temporal nerve: Frontalis muscle
  2. Zygomatic nerve: Orbicularis oculi muscle
  3. Buccal nerve: Buccinator and orbicularis oris muscle
  4. Marginal mandibular nerve: Orbicularis oris muscle
  5. Cervical nerve: Platysma muscle
  6. Posterior auricular nerve: Occipitalis muscle
Service Pen.
Serving me since 2010, the BIC 4-colour ballpoint pen has been my pen of choice while on service. I carry a set of two or three with me in my bag in case I lose one, or if my attendings need to borrow a pen for the day. It writes well, gives me multiple highlight colours for different priority issues when reviewing my patient list and comes at a reasonable price. 
The above is a quick sketch I made of the iconic pen while I was on call.

Service Pen.

Serving me since 2010, the BIC 4-colour ballpoint pen has been my pen of choice while on service. I carry a set of two or three with me in my bag in case I lose one, or if my attendings need to borrow a pen for the day. It writes well, gives me multiple highlight colours for different priority issues when reviewing my patient list and comes at a reasonable price. 

The above is a quick sketch I made of the iconic pen while I was on call.

Formaldehyde Makes Me Hungry by Sean Mutchnik.
"One of the strongest memories I have from Gross Anatomy lab as a first year medical student is the disturbing appetite that builds as you handle raw, human flesh…"
That sounds about right.

Formaldehyde Makes Me Hungry by Sean Mutchnik.

"One of the strongest memories I have from Gross Anatomy lab as a first year medical student is the disturbing appetite that builds as you handle raw, human flesh…"

That sounds about right.

Plate XXII: Lymph vessels of the head, trunk and arm, forearm and hand from Handbuch der Anatomie des Menschen (1841) by Dr. Carl Ernest Bock.

Plate XXII: Lymph vessels of the head, trunk and arm, forearm and hand from Handbuch der Anatomie des Menschen (1841) by Dr. Carl Ernest Bock.

Bring Coffee.
There are some nights on call when you just desperately need coffee to pull through it all but the coffee shops are closed. Where is the Batman?

Bring Coffee.

There are some nights on call when you just desperately need coffee to pull through it all but the coffee shops are closed. Where is the Batman?

Where did he even get that font?!
Sometimes, a poorly legible note is only made worse when it is scanned into the computer. Detail is lost, the writing is faded, and what may have been semi-legible is completely incomprehensible. Welcome to first world medical problems.

Where did he even get that font?!

Sometimes, a poorly legible note is only made worse when it is scanned into the computer. Detail is lost, the writing is faded, and what may have been semi-legible is completely incomprehensible. Welcome to first world medical problems.

Wound Man circa 1400s.

Before medical anatomical studies flourished in the Renaissance period, the physician had a Wound Man diagram. First appearing in European surgical texts of the Middle Ages, it was a schematic diagram that outlined the various wounds a person might suffer in battle or in accidents and served as a quick reference for treatment approaches.