Posts tagged inspiration

It’s in the act of making things that we figure out who we are.
Austin Kleon.
A Journeyman’s Inspiration.

Despite how busy this CaRMS tour may be, it has been a great experience exploring the cultural diversity of the country. Every city carries its own charm and personality while the people have been bigger than life and lively even in -40 degrees Celsius weather. Their energy and resilience were infectious. 

In the midst of the chaos of interviews, for fleeting moments through the city on the streets, buses, and trains, I felt alive.

A Journeyman’s Inspiration.

Despite how busy this CaRMS tour may be, it has been a great experience exploring the cultural diversity of the country. Every city carries its own charm and personality while the people have been bigger than life and lively even in -40 degrees Celsius weather. Their energy and resilience were infectious.

In the midst of the chaos of interviews, for fleeting moments through the city on the streets, buses, and trains, I felt alive.

I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.
Nelson Mandela, 1918-2013.
A man is only as good as what he loves.
Saul Bellow.

Neil deGrasse Tyson speaks about learning mathematics from the Great Debate: the Storytelling of Science.

I watched this last night and I think it is advice that applies to many of the readers who have asked through the years what to do about their struggles with math, chemistry, physics etc. Certainly, I feel that it applies to those who question if medicine is too hard for their passion to stay alive.

With practice, you can become better at your craft, no matter what discipline you pursue. It takes time, it takes work, and it takes practice. But you do eventually get there.

Watch the full Q & A session linked above for other responses by Dr. Lawrence Krauss and Bill Nye to this question.

Superformula to Fight Cancer.

This is a very heartwarming idea. In a bid to give children afflicted with cancer hope and inspiration, the designers at JWT Brazil have created “super formula” cases for their chemotherapy regimens. These formulas come with a video vignette, showing the superheroes affected similarly, and getting stronger when they take their very own super formulas.

If this can give a child the strength the carry on, or even bring a smile to their face, then these cases have done their job.

He Who Inspires…

Recently, I had the great pleasure of working with a specialist. While I found him to be an excellent doctor and teacher of his field, he impressed me more with his mastery of the art of medicine.

Watching him work reminded me of the heart it takes to work with patients.

After spending a morning with him, I can honestly say without hesitation: I have never been more inspired about medicine.

There was nothing complicated or mysterious about his interactions with patients. There was no parlour tricks or unnatural question structure. It was just him, his patient, and the problem. His language was simple, his examples relevant, and his explanations honest. 

We often talk about empathy as a tool to help us connect to a patient. In my hands, it is an embarrassingly clunky, yet unrefined hammer of “it must be frustrating,” or that “I see you are upset.” His was the precision cut scalpel that sliced to the core issues and emotions. 

Patients simply opened up to and connected with him. And I, sitting in my seat, even felt the transference of emotions at times as well. It was a powerful and beautiful display of the art of medicine at work.

To his patients, it was an overwhelming sense of feeling human in the eyes of a stranger, to not feel like a bag of meat at the mercy of a probe and a blade. To him, it was just the way medicine had always been and would continue to be.

For me, it was the revelation of what it is to truly practice great medicine.

Wherever the art of Medicine is loved, there is also a love of Humanity.
Hippocrates

The Rural Imprint

After spending four weeks here, today marks the last day of my rural rotation. Through it all, I have seen patients with six different family physicians, done rounds with them in long-term care, and spent time with them at the hospital. It has been a month filled with experiences, stories, and memories. 

Rural medicine truly is something different. It has given me a new lens through which to see how medicine can be practiced. The continuity of care, the increased responsibilities, and the increased competency needed to practice have all been demonstrated by the doctors I have come in contact with. They have wowed me with their versatility and their mastery of the art of medicine.

A lot of that comes from the environment they work in. Rural medicine is a demanding area, one where resources are limited and the dependence of a community bears down heavily on the health care profession. After all, family physicians are the point of first contact. With those kinds of pressures, one naturally grows into the role. 

The past month has been a unique opportunity to see family medicine practiced in a more holistic way. It has been a privilege to work with these doctors who are as passionate about this form of medicine as they are dedicated to their craft. They have inspired me to do better and think bigger. This rural rotation is an experience that I shall carry with me for the rest of my career.

Now, it is time to say a long good bye as I depart this community for the metropolis, where new experiences await.

I don't know if you do it intentionally, but you really romanticize med school. Every time I read your personal stories or just see you post, I heavily consider forgetting everything else, and becoming a Bio. major when I start college next year. I don't know whether to thank you or not. XD — Asked by br0sh-deactivated20130118

I am not sure if I should be saying “you are welcome” or “thank you for the compliment” here, br0sh. You have caught me in a tough spot! :)

In all honesty though my writing style, to my recollection, has always been along this line. When I first started this blog, I had no idea where it would take me. The overarching goal was to paint my story of medical school. Everything you see here happened in some way shape or form. Though details are for the most part changed for privacy and confidentiality reasons, the essence of what I post is real. 

Of course, there is always a flip side to everything; at the moment I have chosen, perhaps consciously or subconsciously, to focus on this opposite side less. 

The principles that guide my writing are: my desire to not lose sight of the idealism and positivity that drew me to medicine in the first place, to speak about and share my experiences with honesty and transparency, and to respect the moral, ethical, and professional codes of the faculty and of the profession.

This is the framework from which I write and though I do concede it has limitations in some respects, it also has untapped potential in others. I am glad that you have found my writing engaging and positive. Though I do not know if you will consider a path in medicine, I am happy to have shared an experience that allowed you to contemplate it.

All the best to you and your journey. Cheers.