Posts tagged med school

Mailbag: Post-CaRMS

A second batch of questions from my inbox. My apologies to those who waited and are still waiting.

Map of Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks

The Global Health Program at the Council on Foreign Relations has been tracking news reports since 2008 to produce an interactive map that plots global outbreaks of diseases that are easily prevented by inexpensive and effective vaccines. These diseases include measles, mumps, whooping cough, polio, and rubella.

Today…

…is my last clinical day of medical school.

…is my last day seeing patients before residency.

…is my last day introducing myself to patients as a medical student.

Though I still have a month plus change of classes before school is officially over, I am both excited and terrified of what is to come.

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Sushi Night.
It was the end of a very long day. We had skipped lunch to catch up on our patient load and I was famished. I hopped into my car and proceeded to the nearest restaurant I could find, a sushi joint.
I made a beeline for the take out section and found what I was looking for: a party platter. 
"Do you need chopsticks to go?" asked the cashier.
"Yes, please."
"How many sets?" I paused and pondered. Should I be honest? Just say one? No, I will look like a pig. Just lie to not look desperate.
"Um…four."
She started packing my purchase for my supposed night of fun and games with friends.
Nay, there would be no such thing. Just a stack of study books, sushi, and four sets of chopsticks. 

Sushi Night.

It was the end of a very long day. We had skipped lunch to catch up on our patient load and I was famished. I hopped into my car and proceeded to the nearest restaurant I could find, a sushi joint.

I made a beeline for the take out section and found what I was looking for: a party platter. 

"Do you need chopsticks to go?" asked the cashier.

"Yes, please."

"How many sets?" I paused and pondered. Should I be honest? Just say one? No, I will look like a pig. Just lie to not look desperate.

"Um…four."

She started packing my purchase for my supposed night of fun and games with friends.

Nay, there would be no such thing. Just a stack of study books, sushi, and four sets of chopsticks. 

When Services Converge

In one of those unplanned coincidences, two police patrol units, two paramedic crews, and an emergency physician showed up within minutes of each other at the Starbucks I am sitting in. 

It was an interesting sight to see, watching an impromptu gathering unfold where everyone could take a few minutes to sit down, relax, and talk about something else besides business, away from the ruckus of the emergency department before their shifts start.

Part 4: References

The crux to any good application is the reference letter. You could have a stellar application but if there is no one to vouch for you, it can be an uphill battle to the specialty you want, especially if it is highly competitive.

A disease must be regarded as an indivisible whole from its beginning to its end, a regular set of characteristic symptoms and a succession of periods.
Phillipe Pinel.

Part 3: Understanding CaRMS

Since 2002, the residency application process has been managed through the Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS). Everyone who is a Canadian medical student is automatically enrolled into the service. Others can apply to be apart of the process. For medical students in their final year of training, this is where the magic happens.

Does Cauterizing A Wound Really Work? by The Medicine Journal.

Part 2: Choosing Electives

One of the first major challenges of applying to residency is making yourself presentable, to tailor your experiences to the career you want to achieve. The last year of school is generally reserved as the time to pursue electives in the various disciplines.

In general, every school has certain requirements that must be achieved, such as having at least one elective in medical, surgical, and primary care specialties. Beyond that however, you have the flexibility to choose whatever you want to do.