Posts tagged medicine

Meeting a friend.
I received an email recently from a friend who is currently going through fourth year medical school remotely. To my pleasant surprise, she was in town for an elective.
After a brief correspondence, we managed to find time this morning to meet for coffee. We talked about our lives, our respective training thus far, and our future plans. It is remarkable to hear how our lives and experiences can be so similar despite how different our programs are, from the challenges of clerkship to the stresses of applying for residency.
The story of medicine is truly a universal one. 

Meeting a friend.

I received an email recently from a friend who is currently going through fourth year medical school remotely. To my pleasant surprise, she was in town for an elective.

After a brief correspondence, we managed to find time this morning to meet for coffee. We talked about our lives, our respective training thus far, and our future plans. It is remarkable to hear how our lives and experiences can be so similar despite how different our programs are, from the challenges of clerkship to the stresses of applying for residency.

The story of medicine is truly a universal one. 

When you begin examining the child of two doctors and they watch your every move with scrutiny.

Tapeworm parasitic infection following daily sashimi diet for years.

The initial complaint this Chinese man presented with were a stomach ache and itchy skin. After further testing, the doctors came to the discovery that his body had been completely invaded with tapeworm parasites. 

The encysted larvae were embedded deep within the man’s tissues, save for his brain, which would have resulted in the more serious complication of neurocysticercosis.

This man turned out to be an avid sushi eater and ate raw sashimi on an almost daily basis for years. 

The paediatric equivalent to the word cancer is autism. The A-word. It is the bad word, the taboo word that no parent wants to hear.
Paediatric attending.

Cancer Family by Nancy Borowick. (republished with permission)

The burden of cancer does not fall upon just the individual, but also upon the family and friends who support them. It is this shared experience that is so important yet often missed in the cancer narrative. We must always consider how everyone else is surviving this diagnosis.

Nancy Borowick’s mother had been fighting breast cancer for nearly 20 years when her husband was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. They underwent treatment together for a year before he succumbed to his condition.

She sought to document the pain and the challenges they faced in this time but also their strength and their courage together, “from the daily banter they shared as husband and wife to their shifting dynamic as patient and caregiver.

"Cancer gave my family a harsh yet valuable gift: an awareness of time."

Nancy continues to document her mother’s day to day life, from the grief of losing her husband to the strength she finds through her family and friends. For instance, Nancy’s brother-in-law, Paul Flach from the UK, has also lost his father to cancer. He is running the Berlin Marathon this September as part of the UK Institute for Cancer Research fundraising team.

42 CME Credits

Now that I have started residency, I have also invested into an UpToDate subscription. This online clinical resource logs the time you spend researching and reading different topics. In less than three months’ time, I have already amassed 42 continuing medical education credits. 

A single credit is the equivalent of an hour of additional reading. 

In essence, I am averaging roughly 12 hours of reading every month on UpToDate. This is in addition to some other bits of reading I do here and there on guidelines, position statements, and textbooks. 

However, it just goes to show that a little bit every day goes a long way.

A Woman’s Life by Stonehouse.

A preceptor once told me the greatest joy of his profession was watching his patients grow. Some of them he encountered later in their life. Those whom he had the opportunity to be involved with from the very beginning however hold a special place for him. It is the good times and the bad times, the times when the first tooth erupts or the first day they walk, and the times when they first go to school or graduate from college.

That is the special privilege we have to be involved in people’s lives.

Woman of 24 found to have no cerebellum in her brain

A woman living in China’s Shandong Province got a bit of a surprise recently when doctors at the Chinese PLA General Hospital told her that her brain was missing one of the most important centers for motor control: the cerebellum. She had initially checked herself into the hospital because of a bad case of dizziness and nausea.

Her diagnosis helped explain some of the challenges she had experienced through the course of her life, including slurred speech, delayed onset of walking until the age of seven and troubles with maintaining balance her entire life.

That Horrible Feeling

When you see patients with scabies or pink eye and you feel the creepy crawlies just itching under your fingers and eyes for the rest of the day.

The Effect of Non-Vaccination.
This year the United States is experiencing a record number of measles cases. From January 1 to August 29, there have been 592 confirmed measles cases reported to CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). This is the highest number of cases since measles elimination was documented in the U.S. in 2000.
The majority of the people who got measles are unvaccinated.
Measles is still common in many parts of the world including some countries in Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa, travelers with measles continue to bring the disease into the U.S.
Measles can spread when it reaches a community in the U.S. where groups of people are unvaccinated.

The Effect of Non-Vaccination.

This year the United States is experiencing a record number of measles cases. From January 1 to August 29, there have been 592 confirmed measles cases reported to CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD). This is the highest number of cases since measles elimination was documented in the U.S. in 2000.

  • The majority of the people who got measles are unvaccinated.
  • Measles is still common in many parts of the world including some countries in Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa, travelers with measles continue to bring the disease into the U.S.
  • Measles can spread when it reaches a community in the U.S. where groups of people are unvaccinated.