Posts tagged neurology

 Cranial Nerve VII.
Lacrimal gland
Pterogopalatine ganglion
Motor nucleus of cranial nerve VII
Superior salivatory (lacrimal) nucleus
Nucleus solitarius (rostral gustatory portion)
Spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve
Internal acoustic meatus
Stylomastoid foramen
Petrotympanic fissure (chorda tympani nerve)
Submandibular ganglion
Submandibular gland
Sublingual gland
Six branches of cranial nerve VII of head and neck expression
Temporal nerve: Frontalis muscle
Zygomatic nerve: Orbicularis oculi muscle
Buccal nerve: Buccinator and orbicularis oris muscle
Marginal mandibular nerve: Orbicularis oris muscle
Cervical nerve: Platysma muscle
Posterior auricular nerve: Occipitalis muscle

 Cranial Nerve VII.

  1. Lacrimal gland
  2. Pterogopalatine ganglion
  3. Motor nucleus of cranial nerve VII
  4. Superior salivatory (lacrimal) nucleus
  5. Nucleus solitarius (rostral gustatory portion)
  6. Spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve
  7. Internal acoustic meatus
  8. Stylomastoid foramen
  9. Petrotympanic fissure (chorda tympani nerve)
  10. Submandibular ganglion
  11. Submandibular gland
  12. Sublingual gland

Six branches of cranial nerve VII of head and neck expression

  1. Temporal nerve: Frontalis muscle
  2. Zygomatic nerve: Orbicularis oculi muscle
  3. Buccal nerve: Buccinator and orbicularis oris muscle
  4. Marginal mandibular nerve: Orbicularis oris muscle
  5. Cervical nerve: Platysma muscle
  6. Posterior auricular nerve: Occipitalis muscle

Resection of an Oligodendroglioma. (Not Safe for Work)

Charles Trippy, a YouTube personality recently underwent brain surgery to resect an oligodendroglioma, a type of brain cancer. While there is not a step-by-step explanation of the process, it is a worthwhile video to observe what the process of surgery looks like. In this case, part of the surgery is done while conscious to ensure that neurological, motor, and sensory function is preserved.

There is nothing quite like…

…trying to present a complicated neurological case to a neurologist while sounding like I know what I am talking about.

From the thorough neurology-centric history and physical to synthesizing region and tract-specific differentials of what might be going on, it was madness considering neurology is most definitely not one of my strong suits.

Iron Bar Removed from Builder's Head

Eduardo Leite, a 24-year-old construction worker was hit with an iron bar that fell from the fifth floor. The iron bar impaled his hard hat near the vertex of his skull and exited between his eyes. The iron bar has since been removed by the surgical team.

The report from the neurosurgeon suggests that the bar penetrated a part of the brain with no specific, major known function. However, it remains to be seen what, if any, damages will manifest themselves in this modern day Phineas Gauge incident until after he has had time to recover.

Phineas Gage's Connectome

Modern technology provides a fresh perspective on the most famous case study in the history of neuroscience.

Phineas Gage is arguably the most famous neuroscience case in history. A railroad worker in the mid-19th century, he survived an accident when an iron tamping rod, propelled by exploding blasting powder shot back and ran all the way through his skull. Following his recovery, he exhibited a personality change and other alterations. His survival and his recovery has been studied by neurologists for over 150 years, and now with the benefit of modern technology, scientists can look at exactly how his brain rewired itself after the accident.

Development of the Human Embryonic Brain from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

We were shown this video in class as part of a lecture on the biology of learning and memory. No matter how you look at it, it is impressive how much the brain grows in size, swelling with newly formed neurones who spread their fingerlike synapses impulsively through the far corners of the neurological system.

Neuroanatomy.
I have always had a pretty good sense of spatial orientation but recently I have been struggling to keep spatial maps clear in my head. I now find myself committing neural tracts to paper to give them a long hard look. As we continue to add more and more layers of detail, my need for diagrams will only increase.

Neuroanatomy.

I have always had a pretty good sense of spatial orientation but recently I have been struggling to keep spatial maps clear in my head. I now find myself committing neural tracts to paper to give them a long hard look. As we continue to add more and more layers of detail, my need for diagrams will only increase.

Allan Jones: A Map of the Brain from TED Talks.

How can we begin to understand the way the brain works? The same way we begin to understand a city: by making a map. In this visually stunning talk, Allan Jones shows how his team is mapping which genes are turned on in each tiny region, and how it all connects up.

Brain Connection Map.
Computationally, the brain is a very complex processor. Neurons synapse everywhere. Each neuron could be synapsing with ten or more others, both neighbouring and distant. This map of an owl-monkey brain just shows how intricate the connections can be. To think about how complex the map would appear for a human brain is mind boggling.
Thanks to both crackedlense and eversolightly for sending this to me!

Brain Connection Map.

Computationally, the brain is a very complex processor. Neurons synapse everywhere. Each neuron could be synapsing with ten or more others, both neighbouring and distant. This map of an owl-monkey brain just shows how intricate the connections can be. To think about how complex the map would appear for a human brain is mind boggling.

Thanks to both crackedlense and eversolightly for sending this to me!