Posts tagged reference

Bugs & Drugs.

This pocket reference has been a saving grace many times on the ward. It is not applicable in a lot of circumstances but in rotations such as emergency, internal medicine, and paediatrics, there was not a day that went by where this book would not be used.

This is my sunday morning book recommendation. For those looking for a digital copy, it is also available on iOS devices.

The Reference Stack.
As I begin packing my belongings for my move for the third year clerkship, I have to decide what resources to take with me. At the moment, these are most of the hard copy books I have available to me. In order from left to right:
SOAP for Family Medicine. Maldonado and Zuniga
SOAP for Emergency Medicine. Bond and Uzelac
SOAP for Internal Medicine. Uzelac, Moon, and Badillo
Essentials of Clinical Examination Handbook. Lincoln et al. 
Pocket Medicine. Sabatine
On Call, Principles and Protocols. Ruedy
Therapeutic Choices. Grey
Pathology of Heart Disease. Lilly
Cardiovascular Physiology. Courneya and Parker
Renal Physiology. Koeppen and Stanton
Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases. Blumenfeld
Medical Microbiology. Brooks et al. 
Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple. Gladwin and Trattler
Netter’s Essential Histology. Ovalle and Nahirney 
Gray’s Anatomy for Student. Drake, Vogl and Mitchell
Gray’s Atlas of Anatomy. Drake et al.
Robbins and Cotran’s Pathologic Basis of Disease. Kumar et al.
Medical Physiology. Boron and Boulpaep
Drug Information Reference. Cadario and Leathem
Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties. Repchinsky
Toronto Notes. Chen and Tran
Bate’s Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking. Bickley
For the medical students, what books do you use and what have you found most useful in your clerkship? Leave a comment below.

The Reference Stack.

As I begin packing my belongings for my move for the third year clerkship, I have to decide what resources to take with me. At the moment, these are most of the hard copy books I have available to me. In order from left to right:

  • SOAP for Family Medicine. Maldonado and Zuniga
  • SOAP for Emergency Medicine. Bond and Uzelac
  • SOAP for Internal Medicine. Uzelac, Moon, and Badillo
  • Essentials of Clinical Examination Handbook. Lincoln et al. 
  • Pocket Medicine. Sabatine
  • On Call, Principles and Protocols. Ruedy
  • Therapeutic Choices. Grey
  • Pathology of Heart Disease. Lilly
  • Cardiovascular Physiology. Courneya and Parker
  • Renal Physiology. Koeppen and Stanton
  • Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases. Blumenfeld
  • Medical Microbiology. Brooks et al. 
  • Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple. Gladwin and Trattler
  • Netter’s Essential Histology. Ovalle and Nahirney 
  • Gray’s Anatomy for Student. Drake, Vogl and Mitchell
  • Gray’s Atlas of Anatomy. Drake et al.
  • Robbins and Cotran’s Pathologic Basis of Disease. Kumar et al.
  • Medical Physiology. Boron and Boulpaep
  • Drug Information Reference. Cadario and Leathem
  • Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties. Repchinsky
  • Toronto Notes. Chen and Tran
  • Bate’s Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking. Bickley

For the medical students, what books do you use and what have you found most useful in your clerkship? Leave a comment below.

11 Apps for the Medical Student

The recent rise of smartphones and tablets has opened up the doors for new ways we can use technology in our day-to-day lives. From reading news to playing games, it seems that we suddenly have a lot more options and a lot more flexibility.

Medicine has leveraged these advances to make tools and utilities that can take advantage of the new market, where a computer and more importantly the software that is on it has become portable.

Nearing the start of my clinical years, I present to you my list of phone and tablet apps that I currently use or have used in the past that I feel will continue to be useful for any medical student.

Disclaimer: The following apps are all available for iOS. Availability online, on Android, Blackberry, or any other operating system may vary depending on the author of the respective programs.