Posts tagged residency

Meeting a friend.
I received an email recently from a friend who is currently going through fourth year medical school remotely. To my pleasant surprise, she was in town for an elective.
After a brief correspondence, we managed to find time this morning to meet for coffee. We talked about our lives, our respective training thus far, and our future plans. It is remarkable to hear how our lives and experiences can be so similar despite how different our programs are, from the challenges of clerkship to the stresses of applying for residency.
The story of medicine is truly a universal one. 

Meeting a friend.

I received an email recently from a friend who is currently going through fourth year medical school remotely. To my pleasant surprise, she was in town for an elective.

After a brief correspondence, we managed to find time this morning to meet for coffee. We talked about our lives, our respective training thus far, and our future plans. It is remarkable to hear how our lives and experiences can be so similar despite how different our programs are, from the challenges of clerkship to the stresses of applying for residency.

The story of medicine is truly a universal one. 

When you begin examining the child of two doctors and they watch your every move with scrutiny.

The paediatric equivalent to the word cancer is autism. The A-word. It is the bad word, the taboo word that no parent wants to hear.
Paediatric attending.

42 CME Credits

Now that I have started residency, I have also invested into an UpToDate subscription. This online clinical resource logs the time you spend researching and reading different topics. In less than three months’ time, I have already amassed 42 continuing medical education credits. 

A single credit is the equivalent of an hour of additional reading. 

In essence, I am averaging roughly 12 hours of reading every month on UpToDate. This is in addition to some other bits of reading I do here and there on guidelines, position statements, and textbooks. 

However, it just goes to show that a little bit every day goes a long way.

That Horrible Feeling

When you see patients with scabies or pink eye and you feel the creepy crawlies just itching under your fingers and eyes for the rest of the day.

Jesus H. Cox, M.D.

Sadly, every one of my colleagues has met at least one person like this in their lifetime. I recently had to work with someone like this and it was not the most positive learning experience. As a learner, I do not have all of the answers, though I do my best to have one; then again, that is what this residency is all about: learning from my mistakes and learning to be better. Perhaps it was allowable in some bygone era to behave like this but not now.

Take a moment and reflect. Do you know someone like this?

On the Same Wavelength

In the span of twenty minutes while seeing a child in the emergency department, we had bonded over a variety of characters including Spongebob Squarepants, Transformers, Toy Story, Wall-E, and Justice League. 

Suffice it to say we spoke the same language and operated on the same wavelength.

Catching Up

Yesterday was special. A classmate and dear friend of mine who has been out of province for her residency came back for a weekend getaway. We had an opportunity to meet and catch up on how our respective residencies have been thus far.

While war stories were exchanged, the focus was never about the medicine side of things. It was more about how life has been and what we were up to. It was a nice change of pace from my regular conversations nowadays.

For four hours, we were able to disarm ourselves of our ward personas and talk about regular, “normal” things. From the movies we watched, to my recent vacation stories, to her relationship challenges.

At four hours, that mental vacation seemed too short.

The Dangers of Working within Paediatrics

Just when I thought I was out of the woods, I was re-exposed to the most dangerous paediatric affliction of all:

Let-It-Go-itis.

Contrary to its name, this troubling and traumatic condition is just damn hard to let go. It infects the motor and memory recall systems and results in people unconsciously humming or singing to its tune. It has the potential of infecting other people. Prognosis: Very contagious. A full recovery is possible but in the order of weeks so long as you are not re-exposed to it.

Whoever thought of…

…Embedding a Starbucks store right inside of a hospital is a genius.

These stores are make a killing of my wallet.