Posts tagged resource

Denver II Developmental Milestone Assessment

Recently, I have been receiving some questions from my sister-in-law regarding how my niece is developing. She knew some of the milestones to look out for but was asking me if there were others that she could be aware of. 

In light of this, I sifted through my resources to find this chart for her. The Denver II assessment tool is something that I have regularly used while on paediatrics and maps out developmental milestones in all four spheres of growth. 

For any readers who are expectant, new mothers, and medical students currently going through paediatric rotation, this may also prove useful. 

Old School Meets New School.
Red has always been my favourite colour. Whereas I used to only carry a red pocket notebook for keeping my clinical pearls, I now also carry my red iPad mini for accessing textbooks, guidelines, and references. Between these two, the crimson river of information flows.

Old School Meets New School.

Red has always been my favourite colour. Whereas I used to only carry a red pocket notebook for keeping my clinical pearls, I now also carry my red iPad mini for accessing textbooks, guidelines, and references. Between these two, the crimson river of information flows.

Versatile Gadgetry.
After the gradual changes in my clinical habits in the past year, I have finally found enough justification to purchase an iPad mini.
Over the course of my third year, I found myself needing to record notes, read references, and research topics in further detail. One of my saving graces was always the hospital library that afforded me a place to study and access valuable information. In fourth year, this will be much more challenging.
Not wanting to carry textbooks like Harrison’s or Cecil’s Principles of Internal Medicine with me, the versatile weight and form factors of tablet computers are advantageous for clinical work. I will be spending the next few days setting it up for what I hope to be many years of service on and off the ward.

Versatile Gadgetry.

After the gradual changes in my clinical habits in the past year, I have finally found enough justification to purchase an iPad mini.

Over the course of my third year, I found myself needing to record notes, read references, and research topics in further detail. One of my saving graces was always the hospital library that afforded me a place to study and access valuable information. In fourth year, this will be much more challenging.

Not wanting to carry textbooks like Harrison’s or Cecil’s Principles of Internal Medicine with me, the versatile weight and form factors of tablet computers are advantageous for clinical work. I will be spending the next few days setting it up for what I hope to be many years of service on and off the ward.

Approach to the OSCE: The Edmonton Manual of Common Clinical Scenarios.

I went to the hospital library and discovered that some books were being replaced with new editions or new copies. Not left to be discarded, the older books were being given away for free.

And you know how much I love free stuff.

I managed to snatch up this treasure of a book from the heap. It should come in handy for reading around presenting symptoms as well as to prepare for future OSCEs.

Road to Residency

Steven McGaughey, first featured here with his Gastric Subway illustration, has been hard at work on a new website for medical students. A primer to the residency journey, he and his fiancée have worked over the last few months compiling information and useful resources for the application, the interviews, and the match. Check it out.

Before the smartphone industry exploded with the introduction of Apple’s iPhone, the healthcare sector’s premium software found a home on a different breed of devices: your Palms, Blackberries, and Windows Mobiles.
The playing field is totally different now. With the entry of Windows Phone 7 and later the Surface line of RT-powered tablets, Microsoft is hoping to win back some of its former glory and dominance. But progress is slow. To this day, medical apps for the healthcare professional is still hard to come by on the marketplace. Nonetheless, they are there and they are coming, albeit slowly. Here are twenty suggestions:
Laboratory
Pocket Lab Values: This app includes more than 320 lab values. It includes a differential diagnoses for the lab findings as well as websites for each lab value. In addition, there is a note taking feature to add additional information.
Calculator
MedCalc3000: This app includes over 550 medical equations, clinical criterias, decision tree tools and dose/unit converters. It caters to a wide variety of topics and a wide range of health professionals. There are more specific apps included in this family, including the cardiac, pulmonary etc. Otherwise, there is a Complete edition that is available.
Pharmaceutical
Micromedex Drug Information (Tablet): An evidence-based drug information app like its counterparts on Android and iOS, this app is tailored for the Windows RT tablet. Unfortunately at this time, no phone version is available.
MPR: Monthly Prescribing Reference provides prescription and over the counter drug information, side effects and interactions. The information here is not as in depth as most but does offer a large database of monographs and serves as a decent drug reference on your phone.
Epocrates (Pinned): At this time, Epocrates is not available as a dedicated app. However, you can still create access to the same resources by pinning the Epocrates website (https://online.epocrates.com) onto your home screen. While it is not perfect, it is a start.
Anatomy
Miniatlas Anatomy: This app contains illustrations and explanations  around various body parts. It serves as an interactive reference and education tool.
Tools
Dropbox: A cloud-based service that offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.
Evernote: A note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
Flashlight: For the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
Translate This: This could be the only tool to help you in a situation where there is a language barrier and no one to translate.
Clinical
UpToDate (Tablet): This product really needs no introduction as it is a household name for most clinicians. Having said that, it is not a house brand across all of Windows’ products. This is currently only available on the RT tablets but plans are underway to port it to the phone in the near future.
AHRQ ePSS (Tablet): Also available in other devices, the Electronic Preventive Services Selector was developed to assist primary clinicians identify the screening, counselling, and preventive medication services that are appropriate for their patients. This is again only available on RT tablets.
Medscape (Pinned): Like Epocrates, this is currently not available by traditional means. However, by pinning the webpage onto your homepage, you can have a reasonable alternative that serves the same purpose, so long as you have an internet connection.
Merck Manual: A digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom. This package integrates expert descriptions of diagnosis and management of diseases with an A to Z symptoms guide and an award-winning drug guide.
Diagnosaurus: A differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.
Pediatric Care Online: This subscription based app offers a comprehensive source for paediatric patients. It has disease and symptom references, a paediatric drug guideline and other guidelines involving management.
Medline Plus: This is the National Institutes of Health’s web site for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, it brings you information about diseases, conditions, and wellness issues in language you can understand.
Review
Medical Mnemonics: This app includes over 1400 acronyms, rhymes and memory tricks on a wide variety of topics. It makes it convenient to search through with filters by discipline and system. You also have the option to add your own mnemonics to the app.
USMLE: A flashcard bank of questions in preparation of the USMLE Step 1 including topics around anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology and behavioral sciences. 
MCAT Exam Review: A flashcard bank of questions in preparation of the MCAT. 
The market is still growing for Windows phones and tablets. Hopefully as time goes on, more medical apps will become available. For now, this is a good starting place. What apps do you use?

Before the smartphone industry exploded with the introduction of Apple’s iPhone, the healthcare sector’s premium software found a home on a different breed of devices: your Palms, Blackberries, and Windows Mobiles.

The playing field is totally different now. With the entry of Windows Phone 7 and later the Surface line of RT-powered tablets, Microsoft is hoping to win back some of its former glory and dominance. But progress is slow. To this day, medical apps for the healthcare professional is still hard to come by on the marketplace. Nonetheless, they are there and they are coming, albeit slowly. Here are twenty suggestions:

Laboratory

  • Pocket Lab Values: This app includes more than 320 lab values. It includes a differential diagnoses for the lab findings as well as websites for each lab value. In addition, there is a note taking feature to add additional information.

Calculator

  • MedCalc3000: This app includes over 550 medical equations, clinical criterias, decision tree tools and dose/unit converters. It caters to a wide variety of topics and a wide range of health professionals. There are more specific apps included in this family, including the cardiac, pulmonary etc. Otherwise, there is a Complete edition that is available.

Pharmaceutical

  • Micromedex Drug Information (Tablet): An evidence-based drug information app like its counterparts on Android and iOS, this app is tailored for the Windows RT tablet. Unfortunately at this time, no phone version is available.
  • MPR: Monthly Prescribing Reference provides prescription and over the counter drug information, side effects and interactions. The information here is not as in depth as most but does offer a large database of monographs and serves as a decent drug reference on your phone.
  • Epocrates (Pinned): At this time, Epocrates is not available as a dedicated app. However, you can still create access to the same resources by pinning the Epocrates website (https://online.epocrates.com) onto your home screen. While it is not perfect, it is a start.

Anatomy

  • Miniatlas AnatomyThis app contains illustrations and explanations  around various body parts. It serves as an interactive reference and education tool.

Tools

  • Dropbox: A cloud-based service that offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.
  • Evernote: A note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
  • Flashlight: For the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
  • Translate This: This could be the only tool to help you in a situation where there is a language barrier and no one to translate.

Clinical

  • UpToDate (Tablet): This product really needs no introduction as it is a household name for most clinicians. Having said that, it is not a house brand across all of Windows’ products. This is currently only available on the RT tablets but plans are underway to port it to the phone in the near future.
  • AHRQ ePSS (Tablet): Also available in other devices, the Electronic Preventive Services Selector was developed to assist primary clinicians identify the screening, counselling, and preventive medication services that are appropriate for their patients. This is again only available on RT tablets.
  • Medscape (Pinned): Like Epocrates, this is currently not available by traditional means. However, by pinning the webpage onto your homepage, you can have a reasonable alternative that serves the same purpose, so long as you have an internet connection.
  • Merck Manual: A digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom. This package integrates expert descriptions of diagnosis and management of diseases with an A to Z symptoms guide and an award-winning drug guide.
  • Diagnosaurus: A differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.
  • Pediatric Care Online: This subscription based app offers a comprehensive source for paediatric patients. It has disease and symptom references, a paediatric drug guideline and other guidelines involving management.
  • Medline Plus: This is the National Institutes of Health’s web site for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, it brings you information about diseases, conditions, and wellness issues in language you can understand.

Review

  • Medical Mnemonics: This app includes over 1400 acronyms, rhymes and memory tricks on a wide variety of topics. It makes it convenient to search through with filters by discipline and system. You also have the option to add your own mnemonics to the app.
  • USMLE: A flashcard bank of questions in preparation of the USMLE Step 1 including topics around anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology and behavioral sciences
  • MCAT Exam Review: A flashcard bank of questions in preparation of the MCAT. 

The market is still growing for Windows phones and tablets. Hopefully as time goes on, more medical apps will become available. For now, this is a good starting place. What apps do you use?

While Apple may have changed the way we think about smartphones and tablet computing, pioneering the way for a new industry of app design, they are not alone in this market. Following yesterday’s list, here are some resources that are available for your Android. Note that many developers have submitted apps to both marketplaces so there is overlap.
Laboratory
Normal Lab Values: Quick access to the most common laboratory values. There may only be 150 available when you install it but you have the option to add new categories and new lab values.
Acid Plus: A calculator tool that helps tease out the type of acidotic or alkalotic process involved.
Calculators
BiliCalc: Like BiliTool, this tool helps calculate bilirubin levels in neonates and gives recommendations based on the risk stratification of jaundice.
Mediquations Med Calculator: A premium calculator that has a more streamlined design and more comprehensive formulas than Qx Calculate. 
Qx Calculate: A free calculator for many of the formulas and algorithms in medicine including risk calculators and unit conversions.
Pharmaceutical
Lexicomp: The standard for monograph information, this subscription-based app includes routine updates to the drug database for newly added medications and warnings. It includes a drug interactions calculator.
Epocrates: For the free alternative, Epocrates continues to be a favorite among my classmates and attendings. It includes the standard dosing and regimens for medications but offers less detailed information regarding them compared to Lexicomp.
Micromedex: Another decent alternative that is updated regularly with the most recent warnings and medications. There is a basic free form with premium add-ons including the drug interactions tool.
Skyscape RxDrugs: Like the others, this app provides dosing guidelines on thousands of commonly used drugs. It includes nearly 400 integrated weight-based drug dosing calculators. 
Anatomy
Netter’s Atlas of Human Anatomy: While it certainly is not cheap, it is Netter. All of his anatomical plates have been compiled into this app for easy reviewing and learning.
Visual Anatomy: This app takes the Gray’s Anatomy approach and integrates many of the illustrations from Gray’s and supplements it with 3D models.
Clinical
Medscape: A basic app that includes drug interaction calculator, a procedures reference and daily news in the world of medicine.
Skyscape: A free app that includes a number of resources to help with clinical decision making. Designed to be a one-stop shop, you can purchase and subscribe to more features and resources within depending on your needs.
PEPID: A clinical companion tool that provides summary information around conditions, include a brief explanation of the condition, the investigations, differential, and the treatment plan. Written in a concise form for the learner on the go.
UpToDate: The clinical companion tool that is a favourite among the attendings. This subscription-based app comes in both an online or offline version and mirrors the desktop counterpart. Including in-depth review of disease states and clinical pearls surrounding therapy.
Medicine Central: This is an integrated mobile and web reference built specifically for physicians, students, residents, and nurse practitioners. Medicine Central brings you comprehensive point-of-care content on the essentials of diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up for over 700 diseases and disorders in a quick-read format.
Merck Manual Suite: A digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom. This package integrates expert descriptions of diagnosis and management of diseases with an A to Z symptoms guide and an award-winning drug guide.
Eponym: For the medical student, half the battle is learning the language of medicine. Eponyms explains the common and obscure terms and signs of medicine named after their discoverers.
DxSaurus: A differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.
Bugs and Drugs: A reference tool for antimicrobial therapy, the dosing guidelines and the sensitivity tables of all antibiotics.
Oxford Medical Dictionary: Includes definitions for nearly 10,000 terms used in modern medicine. 
Tools
Google Translate: This could be the only tool to help you in a situation where there is a language barrier and no one to translate.
Flashlight: For the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
Evernote: A note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
Drive/Dropbox: A cloud-based service like Drive or Dropbox offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.
Review
EKGdroid: A simple arrhythmia guide, it explains each component of the EKG and the arrhythmia patterns.
Medical Mnemonics: If you learn best with mnemonics, this may be the app for you. Medical Mnemonics puts over 1500 clever acronyms, rhymes, and memory tricks on your Android, on topics ranging from Anatomy and Biochemistry to Pharmacology and Surgery.
MCAT Prep Chem: For the pre-med student who wants to study on the go, this app covers all of the aspects of MCAT prep for general and organic chemistry. All the content is arranged by topic and category for easy navigation.
MCAT Prep Bio:For the pre-med student who wants to study on the go, this app covers all of the aspects of MCAT prep for general, molecular biology, genetics etc. All the content is arranged by topic and category for easy navigation.
USMLE World QBank: For the medical student preparing for exams, the QBank is an important resource to have.
This list is by no means exhaustive but is a good starting point for readers out there interested in finding medical apps. What apps do you use?

While Apple may have changed the way we think about smartphones and tablet computing, pioneering the way for a new industry of app design, they are not alone in this market. Following yesterday’s list, here are some resources that are available for your Android. Note that many developers have submitted apps to both marketplaces so there is overlap.

Laboratory

  • Normal Lab Values: Quick access to the most common laboratory values. There may only be 150 available when you install it but you have the option to add new categories and new lab values.
  • Acid PlusA calculator tool that helps tease out the type of acidotic or alkalotic process involved.

Calculators

  • BiliCalcLike BiliTool, this tool helps calculate bilirubin levels in neonates and gives recommendations based on the risk stratification of jaundice.
  • Mediquations Med CalculatorA premium calculator that has a more streamlined design and more comprehensive formulas than Qx Calculate. 
  • Qx CalculateA free calculator for many of the formulas and algorithms in medicine including risk calculators and unit conversions.

Pharmaceutical

  • LexicompThe standard for monograph information, this subscription-based app includes routine updates to the drug database for newly added medications and warnings. It includes a drug interactions calculator.
  • EpocratesFor the free alternative, Epocrates continues to be a favorite among my classmates and attendings. It includes the standard dosing and regimens for medications but offers less detailed information regarding them compared to Lexicomp.
  • MicromedexAnother decent alternative that is updated regularly with the most recent warnings and medications. There is a basic free form with premium add-ons including the drug interactions tool.
  • Skyscape RxDrugsLike the others, this app provides dosing guidelines on thousands of commonly used drugs. It includes nearly 400 integrated weight-based drug dosing calculators. 

Anatomy

  • Netter’s Atlas of Human Anatomy: While it certainly is not cheap, it is Netter. All of his anatomical plates have been compiled into this app for easy reviewing and learning.
  • Visual Anatomy: This app takes the Gray’s Anatomy approach and integrates many of the illustrations from Gray’s and supplements it with 3D models.

Clinical

  • MedscapeA basic app that includes drug interaction calculator, a procedures reference and daily news in the world of medicine.
  • SkyscapeA free app that includes a number of resources to help with clinical decision making. Designed to be a one-stop shop, you can purchase and subscribe to more features and resources within depending on your needs.
  • PEPIDA clinical companion tool that provides summary information around conditions, include a brief explanation of the condition, the investigations, differential, and the treatment plan. Written in a concise form for the learner on the go.
  • UpToDateThe clinical companion tool that is a favourite among the attendings. This subscription-based app comes in both an online or offline version and mirrors the desktop counterpart. Including in-depth review of disease states and clinical pearls surrounding therapy.
  • Medicine Central: This is an integrated mobile and web reference built specifically for physicians, students, residents, and nurse practitioners. Medicine Central brings you comprehensive point-of-care content on the essentials of diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up for over 700 diseases and disorders in a quick-read format.
  • Merck Manual SuiteA digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom. This package integrates expert descriptions of diagnosis and management of diseases with an A to Z symptoms guide and an award-winning drug guide.
  • EponymFor the medical student, half the battle is learning the language of medicine. Eponyms explains the common and obscure terms and signs of medicine named after their discoverers.
  • DxSaurusA differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.
  • Bugs and DrugsA reference tool for antimicrobial therapy, the dosing guidelines and the sensitivity tables of all antibiotics.
  • Oxford Medical Dictionary: Includes definitions for nearly 10,000 terms used in modern medicine. 

Tools

  • Google Translate: This could be the only tool to help you in a situation where there is a language barrier and no one to translate.
  • FlashlightFor the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
  • EvernoteA note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
  • Drive/DropboxA cloud-based service like Drive or Dropbox offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.

Review

  • EKGdroid: A simple arrhythmia guide, it explains each component of the EKG and the arrhythmia patterns.
  • Medical Mnemonics: If you learn best with mnemonics, this may be the app for you. Medical Mnemonics puts over 1500 clever acronyms, rhymes, and memory tricks on your Android, on topics ranging from Anatomy and Biochemistry to Pharmacology and Surgery.
  • MCAT Prep Chem: For the pre-med student who wants to study on the go, this app covers all of the aspects of MCAT prep for general and organic chemistry. All the content is arranged by topic and category for easy navigation.
  • MCAT Prep Bio:For the pre-med student who wants to study on the go, this app covers all of the aspects of MCAT prep for general, molecular biology, genetics etc. All the content is arranged by topic and category for easy navigation.
  • USMLE World QBankFor the medical student preparing for exams, the QBank is an important resource to have.

This list is by no means exhaustive but is a good starting point for readers out there interested in finding medical apps. What apps do you use?

As the popularity of smartphone of tablet computing expands, so too does the library of apps. The following is a list of iOS apps that might be of interest or use for the curious, for the learners, and for the clerks.
Laboratory
LabDx: A reference tool for common laboratory investigations.
Acid Plus: A calculator tool that helps tease out the type of acidotic or alkalotic process involved.
Lytes: A basic reference to the common electrolyte abnormalities, the causes, signs, and symptoms.
Calculators
BiliTool: An online tool that has an optimized mobile format, this tool helps calculate bilirubin levels in neonates and gives recommendations based on the risk stratification of jaundice.
Qx Calculate: A free calculator for many of the formulas and algorithms in medicine including risk calculators and unit conversions.
MedCalc Pro: A premium calculator that has a more streamlined design and more formulas than Qx Calculate. It also allows you to save patient values for use in multiple calculations.
Pharmaceutical
Lexicomp: The standard for monograph information, this subscription-based app includes routine updates to the drug database for newly added medications and warnings. It includes a drug interactions calculator.
Epocrates: For the free alternative, Epocrates continues to be a favorite among my classmates and attendings. It includes the standard dosing and regimens for medications but offers less detailed information regarding them compared to Lexicomp.
Micromedex: Another decent alternative that is updated regularly with the most recent warnings and medications. There is a basic free form with premium add-ons including the drug interactions tool.
Anatomy
Netter’s Anatomy Atlas: Netter is a household name in the world of medical illustrations and all of his anatomical plates have been compiled in this app. A good quick reference of study tool.
Pocket Anatomy/Essential Anatomy: Moving into the third dimension, these two apps despite a premium price, a useful study tool for anyone interested in medicine.
Muscle System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see muscles in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
Skeleton System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see bones in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
Brain and Nervous System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see nerves in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
Radiology
Radiology 2.0: One Night in the ED: A case-based radiological app that goes through the common presentations with a methodical approach.
Clinical
Medscape: A basic app that includes drug interaction calculator, a procedures reference and daily news in the world of medicine.
Skyscape: A free app that includes a number of resources to help with clinical decision making. Designed to be a one-stop shop, you can purchase and subscribe to more features and resources within depending on your needs.
Eponyms: For the medical student, half the battle is learning the language of medicine. Eponyms explains the common and obscure terms and signs of medicine named after their discoverers. 
Bugs and Drugs: A reference tool for antimicrobial therapy, the dosing guidelines and the sensitivity tables of all antibiotics.
PEPID: A clinical companion tool that provides summary information around conditions, include a brief explanation of the condition, the investigations, differential, and the treatment plan. Written in a concise form for the learner on the go.
UpToDate: The clinical companion tool that is a favourite among the attendings. This subscription-based app comes in both an online or offline version and mirrors the desktop counterpart. Including in-depth review of disease states and clinical pearls surrounding therapy.
DxSaurus: A differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.
Reference
The Merck Manual: Professional Edition: A digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom.
Toronto Notes 2012: While not exactly an app, this textbook is an excellent reference for any medical student and is one that I read during quiet moments on shift. A digital copy of this textbook stays with me in my eBooks library.
Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine: This is also not an app but an eBook. An excellent reference for internal medicine, it offers great deal of information and clinical pearls for the hospitalist. 
Tools
Google Translate: For the moments where language is a barrier, this could be the only useful way to gather patient information.
Flashlight: For the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
Evernote: A note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
Drive/Dropbox: A cloud-based service like Drive or Dropbox offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.
Review
USMLE World QBank: For the medical student preparing for exams, the QBank is an important resource to have.
This list is by no means exhaustive but is a good starting point for readers out there interested in finding medical apps. What apps do you use?

As the popularity of smartphone of tablet computing expands, so too does the library of apps. The following is a list of iOS apps that might be of interest or use for the curious, for the learners, and for the clerks.

Laboratory

  • LabDx: A reference tool for common laboratory investigations.
  • Acid Plus: A calculator tool that helps tease out the type of acidotic or alkalotic process involved.
  • Lytes: A basic reference to the common electrolyte abnormalities, the causes, signs, and symptoms.

Calculators

  • BiliTool: An online tool that has an optimized mobile format, this tool helps calculate bilirubin levels in neonates and gives recommendations based on the risk stratification of jaundice.
  • Qx Calculate: A free calculator for many of the formulas and algorithms in medicine including risk calculators and unit conversions.
  • MedCalc Pro: A premium calculator that has a more streamlined design and more formulas than Qx Calculate. It also allows you to save patient values for use in multiple calculations.

Pharmaceutical

  • Lexicomp: The standard for monograph information, this subscription-based app includes routine updates to the drug database for newly added medications and warnings. It includes a drug interactions calculator.
  • Epocrates: For the free alternative, Epocrates continues to be a favorite among my classmates and attendings. It includes the standard dosing and regimens for medications but offers less detailed information regarding them compared to Lexicomp.
  • Micromedex: Another decent alternative that is updated regularly with the most recent warnings and medications. There is a basic free form with premium add-ons including the drug interactions tool.

Anatomy

  • Netter’s Anatomy Atlas: Netter is a household name in the world of medical illustrations and all of his anatomical plates have been compiled in this app. A good quick reference of study tool.
  • Pocket Anatomy/Essential Anatomy: Moving into the third dimension, these two apps despite a premium price, a useful study tool for anyone interested in medicine.
  • Muscle System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see muscles in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
  • Skeleton System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see bones in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.
  • Brain and Nervous System Pro III: For the anatomical enthusiast wishing to see nerves in all their detail and intricacies. Premium.

Radiology

  • Radiology 2.0: One Night in the ED: A case-based radiological app that goes through the common presentations with a methodical approach.

Clinical

  • Medscape: A basic app that includes drug interaction calculator, a procedures reference and daily news in the world of medicine.
  • Skyscape: A free app that includes a number of resources to help with clinical decision making. Designed to be a one-stop shop, you can purchase and subscribe to more features and resources within depending on your needs.
  • Eponyms: For the medical student, half the battle is learning the language of medicine. Eponyms explains the common and obscure terms and signs of medicine named after their discoverers. 
  • Bugs and Drugs: A reference tool for antimicrobial therapy, the dosing guidelines and the sensitivity tables of all antibiotics.
  • PEPID: A clinical companion tool that provides summary information around conditions, include a brief explanation of the condition, the investigations, differential, and the treatment plan. Written in a concise form for the learner on the go.
  • UpToDate: The clinical companion tool that is a favourite among the attendings. This subscription-based app comes in both an online or offline version and mirrors the desktop counterpart. Including in-depth review of disease states and clinical pearls surrounding therapy.
  • DxSaurus: A differential diagnosis generator that works around your working diagnosis or the symptoms you see.

Reference

  • The Merck Manual: Professional Edition: A digital, pocket version of the original reference. Disease states can be searched by section or by symptom.
  • Toronto Notes 2012: While not exactly an app, this textbook is an excellent reference for any medical student and is one that I read during quiet moments on shift. A digital copy of this textbook stays with me in my eBooks library.
  • Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine: This is also not an app but an eBook. An excellent reference for internal medicine, it offers great deal of information and clinical pearls for the hospitalist. 

Tools

  • Google Translate: For the moments where language is a barrier, this could be the only useful way to gather patient information.
  • Flashlight: For the times on call where we do not want to disturb other patients in a dark room as we make our way around.
  • Evernote: A note-taking tool to keep and sort out clinical pearls or to document clinical moments.
  • Drive/Dropbox: A cloud-based service like Drive or Dropbox offers an opportunity to store algorithms, guidelines, or textbooks that you can access anywhere. Now available on your phone or tablet.

Review

  • USMLE World QBank: For the medical student preparing for exams, the QBank is an important resource to have.

This list is by no means exhaustive but is a good starting point for readers out there interested in finding medical apps. What apps do you use?

Chest Pain Evaluation.
The other day, my friends and I got into a discussion about what resources we use on the ward; this is opposed to the resources we use at home. At home we can afford to have a thick textbook that looks and weighs as much as a phone book; on the ward, compact and light is the name of the game.
The above scan comes from one of my more oft-used ward texts, SOAP for Internal Medicine. Each book in the series presents topics in concise two page spreads that focus on the key pieces of information on the history, physical, investigations and management.
More importantly: it fits in my bag; it fits in my scrubs; and it is light.
While it might not be the most comprehensive text, explaining pathophysiology, nuances and every sign and symptom, it does gives me a starting point for when I see patients. 

Chest Pain Evaluation.

The other day, my friends and I got into a discussion about what resources we use on the ward; this is opposed to the resources we use at home. At home we can afford to have a thick textbook that looks and weighs as much as a phone book; on the ward, compact and light is the name of the game.

The above scan comes from one of my more oft-used ward texts, SOAP for Internal Medicine. Each book in the series presents topics in concise two page spreads that focus on the key pieces of information on the history, physical, investigations and management.

More importantly: it fits in my bag; it fits in my scrubs; and it is light.

While it might not be the most comprehensive text, explaining pathophysiology, nuances and every sign and symptom, it does gives me a starting point for when I see patients. 

Becoming a Physician

For many students, finding the right specialty for themselves is a nebulous process. The direction one’s career takes slowly crystallizes in third and fourth year of medical school. It is during this time period that students are exposed to every major specialty and differentiate into their areas of interest.

In a previous post, I wrote about a Canadian guide to residency programs. While it is a good primer for medical students edging closer to graduation, it serves little practical purpose for the outside.

For the prospective medical student, here is a guide to 35 different medical specialties created by the Canadian Medical Association. Follow the link for more details.