Posts tagged textbook

Approach to the OSCE: The Edmonton Manual of Common Clinical Scenarios.

I went to the hospital library and discovered that some books were being replaced with new editions or new copies. Not left to be discarded, the older books were being given away for free.

And you know how much I love free stuff.

I managed to snatch up this treasure of a book from the heap. It should come in handy for reading around presenting symptoms as well as to prepare for future OSCEs.

Bugs & Drugs.

This pocket reference has been a saving grace many times on the ward. It is not applicable in a lot of circumstances but in rotations such as emergency, internal medicine, and paediatrics, there was not a day that went by where this book would not be used.

This is my sunday morning book recommendation. For those looking for a digital copy, it is also available on iOS devices.

Sudden death may be the first manifestation of disease.
Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. Step Up to Medicine.
Chest Pain Evaluation.
The other day, my friends and I got into a discussion about what resources we use on the ward; this is opposed to the resources we use at home. At home we can afford to have a thick textbook that looks and weighs as much as a phone book; on the ward, compact and light is the name of the game.
The above scan comes from one of my more oft-used ward texts, SOAP for Internal Medicine. Each book in the series presents topics in concise two page spreads that focus on the key pieces of information on the history, physical, investigations and management.
More importantly: it fits in my bag; it fits in my scrubs; and it is light.
While it might not be the most comprehensive text, explaining pathophysiology, nuances and every sign and symptom, it does gives me a starting point for when I see patients. 

Chest Pain Evaluation.

The other day, my friends and I got into a discussion about what resources we use on the ward; this is opposed to the resources we use at home. At home we can afford to have a thick textbook that looks and weighs as much as a phone book; on the ward, compact and light is the name of the game.

The above scan comes from one of my more oft-used ward texts, SOAP for Internal Medicine. Each book in the series presents topics in concise two page spreads that focus on the key pieces of information on the history, physical, investigations and management.

More importantly: it fits in my bag; it fits in my scrubs; and it is light.

While it might not be the most comprehensive text, explaining pathophysiology, nuances and every sign and symptom, it does gives me a starting point for when I see patients. 

Afternoon! I was going through your Index/'textbook' tag, and while I did find a few things that came in handy, I still thought I'd give this a shot to you and any of your followers who might have an idea, since they seem to jump in when they can. I came to the decision to become a RN, specifically in the ED, emergency department, and I was curious if there were any good books I should concern myself with? Lots of thanks. — Asked by Anonymous

I could definitely list off a few textbooks that are more specific to emergency medicine if that is what you are looking for. Textbooks more specific to nursing are personally a little harder to come up with.

  • Marx, John A. et al. Rosen’s emergency medicine: concepts and clinical practice, 7th ed. 
  • Tintinalli, Judith E. and J. Stephan Stapczynski. Tintinalli’s emergency medicine: a comprehensive study guide, 7th ed.
  • Simon, Robert R., Scott C. Sherman and Ghazala Q. Sharieff. Emergency orthopedics, 6th ed. 
  • Galli, Robert L., Daniel W. Spaite and Robert R. Simon. Emergency orthopedics: the spine. 
  • Roberts, James R. and Jerris R. Hedges. Clinical procedures in emergency medicine, 5th ed. 

At some point, I will make another full list not of the textbook variety but I will save that for another time.

Would any current nurse or emergency department operator like to help this reader with some good recommendations? Leave a comment here.

The Reference Stack.
As I begin packing my belongings for my move for the third year clerkship, I have to decide what resources to take with me. At the moment, these are most of the hard copy books I have available to me. In order from left to right:
SOAP for Family Medicine. Maldonado and Zuniga
SOAP for Emergency Medicine. Bond and Uzelac
SOAP for Internal Medicine. Uzelac, Moon, and Badillo
Essentials of Clinical Examination Handbook. Lincoln et al. 
Pocket Medicine. Sabatine
On Call, Principles and Protocols. Ruedy
Therapeutic Choices. Grey
Pathology of Heart Disease. Lilly
Cardiovascular Physiology. Courneya and Parker
Renal Physiology. Koeppen and Stanton
Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases. Blumenfeld
Medical Microbiology. Brooks et al. 
Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple. Gladwin and Trattler
Netter’s Essential Histology. Ovalle and Nahirney 
Gray’s Anatomy for Student. Drake, Vogl and Mitchell
Gray’s Atlas of Anatomy. Drake et al.
Robbins and Cotran’s Pathologic Basis of Disease. Kumar et al.
Medical Physiology. Boron and Boulpaep
Drug Information Reference. Cadario and Leathem
Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties. Repchinsky
Toronto Notes. Chen and Tran
Bate’s Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking. Bickley
For the medical students, what books do you use and what have you found most useful in your clerkship? Leave a comment below.

The Reference Stack.

As I begin packing my belongings for my move for the third year clerkship, I have to decide what resources to take with me. At the moment, these are most of the hard copy books I have available to me. In order from left to right:

  • SOAP for Family Medicine. Maldonado and Zuniga
  • SOAP for Emergency Medicine. Bond and Uzelac
  • SOAP for Internal Medicine. Uzelac, Moon, and Badillo
  • Essentials of Clinical Examination Handbook. Lincoln et al. 
  • Pocket Medicine. Sabatine
  • On Call, Principles and Protocols. Ruedy
  • Therapeutic Choices. Grey
  • Pathology of Heart Disease. Lilly
  • Cardiovascular Physiology. Courneya and Parker
  • Renal Physiology. Koeppen and Stanton
  • Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases. Blumenfeld
  • Medical Microbiology. Brooks et al. 
  • Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple. Gladwin and Trattler
  • Netter’s Essential Histology. Ovalle and Nahirney 
  • Gray’s Anatomy for Student. Drake, Vogl and Mitchell
  • Gray’s Atlas of Anatomy. Drake et al.
  • Robbins and Cotran’s Pathologic Basis of Disease. Kumar et al.
  • Medical Physiology. Boron and Boulpaep
  • Drug Information Reference. Cadario and Leathem
  • Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties. Repchinsky
  • Toronto Notes. Chen and Tran
  • Bate’s Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking. Bickley

For the medical students, what books do you use and what have you found most useful in your clerkship? Leave a comment below.

Welcome to the Book Club

On the recommendation of a doctor, I decided to purchase an on-call guide to help me begin thinking clinically about cases. In addition to my triad of medical pocket books, On Call: Principles and Protocols just joined the book club as member number four.

With a growing membership, I better start thinking of ways of increasing pocket sizes or stitching on more pockets on my white coat. Decisions, decisions!

Three Handbooks.
This year, I decided to invest in more portable references than the textbooks that are as thick as phone books. These pocket books are now a key part of my studying when time is of the essence. The three handbooks that I am using are: Toronto Notes, Essentials of Clinical Examination, and Pocket Medicine.

Three Handbooks.

This year, I decided to invest in more portable references than the textbooks that are as thick as phone books. These pocket books are now a key part of my studying when time is of the essence. The three handbooks that I am using are: Toronto Notes, Essentials of Clinical Examination, and Pocket Medicine.

Required Textbooks: 12 Volumes
Recommended Textbooks: 22 Volumes
Estimated Textbook Cost: $2,000.00
Courses Textbook Guide
What Biochemistry book would you suggest? I'm a first year Medical student with Nursing as a pre-Med course. I only have Organic Chemistry as a background before and now Biochemistry seems impossible for me. :( — Asked by Anonymous

I used Medical Physiology: A Cellular and Molecular Approach by Boron and Boulpaep. It is more about relating molecular and cellular biology to physiology and disease so it may not be exactly what you are looking for. Most of all the biochemistry we were taught came straight from our class notes so I did not use much else. Sorry if this is not helpful but I do not have anything else really to recommend.

EDIT: Thanks to both coffee-and-cupcakes and another second year medical student for helping out this reader. They have come up with a few other suggestions:

  • Basic Medical Biochemistry by Marks (this one is detail heavy)
  • Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry by Champe, Harvey and Ferrier (this one is more succinct)
  • Principles of Biochemistry by Lehninger (also a fairly detailed text)

Thanks again for your replies.