Posts tagged trend

A Fast Food Burger Is 3 Times Larger Now Than in The 1950s from the Atlantic.
Echoing my sentiments in this post, it is nauseating to see just how much our foods have grown. Even worse, there shows no signs of stopping. With trend lines this steep, are we too late to reverse the change?
Of course, change is always hard to enact, especially one that forces us to deconstruct what we have grown accustomed to. However, we as a society have shown that when push comes to shove, we are capable of rallying to a great and worthy cause. With the mounting issue of obesity, I am hopeful that we will once again rise up to that challenge.

A Fast Food Burger Is 3 Times Larger Now Than in The 1950s from the Atlantic.

Echoing my sentiments in this post, it is nauseating to see just how much our foods have grown. Even worse, there shows no signs of stopping. With trend lines this steep, are we too late to reverse the change?

Of course, change is always hard to enact, especially one that forces us to deconstruct what we have grown accustomed to. However, we as a society have shown that when push comes to shove, we are capable of rallying to a great and worthy cause. With the mounting issue of obesity, I am hopeful that we will once again rise up to that challenge.

Children today are tyrants. They contradict their parents, gobble their food, and tyrannize their teachers.
Socrates, 470-399 BC
Super-sizing Portions.
You go to the market place, to the restaurant, to the coffee shop, and place your order. Over the years as you became older, bigger, and stronger, so too did the portion sizes of what you ate and drank. We hardly think of it as we transition from youth to adulthood, given how natural it seems and how logical it feels. Yet, as we slowly plateau at our peak years and as our body’s requirements level off, our meals and drinks have continued to grow up with or without us.
In today’s Starbucks generation, a small size drink suitable for a child is 8 fluid ounces; the largest drink sizes available are upwards of 30. Sixty years ago, a regular cup of coffee for an adult would have been 6.5 fluid ounces, with the largest cups of that period, the “king-size,” irking out only 12, what we would consider to be a small-sized drink by today’s standards. 
Of course, market growth has never been a homogenous distribution; some grew by even more extremes. Take for example the Original Hershey chocolate bar. When it was first introduced, it weighed only 0.6 ounce; now the range stretches from 1.6 to 8 ounces - over ten times larger than the original. Fast food and baked goods, including cookies and muffins have also grown up to 8 times larger.
It is a scary trend when put into perspective of the growing obesity epidemic. Already, 26 percent of Canadian children between the ages of 2-17 years old are overweight or obese. Projecting this trend forward should it continue, we can expect 70% of 35-44 year olds in Canada to be overweight or obese in 20 years.
So next time when you order something, ask yourself if it is the right portion size for you.

Super-sizing Portions.

You go to the market place, to the restaurant, to the coffee shop, and place your order. Over the years as you became older, bigger, and stronger, so too did the portion sizes of what you ate and drank. We hardly think of it as we transition from youth to adulthood, given how natural it seems and how logical it feels. Yet, as we slowly plateau at our peak years and as our body’s requirements level off, our meals and drinks have continued to grow up with or without us.

In today’s Starbucks generation, a small size drink suitable for a child is 8 fluid ounces; the largest drink sizes available are upwards of 30. Sixty years ago, a regular cup of coffee for an adult would have been 6.5 fluid ounces, with the largest cups of that period, the “king-size,” irking out only 12, what we would consider to be a small-sized drink by today’s standards. 

Of course, market growth has never been a homogenous distribution; some grew by even more extremes. Take for example the Original Hershey chocolate bar. When it was first introduced, it weighed only 0.6 ounce; now the range stretches from 1.6 to 8 ounces - over ten times larger than the original. Fast food and baked goods, including cookies and muffins have also grown up to 8 times larger.

It is a scary trend when put into perspective of the growing obesity epidemic. Already, 26 percent of Canadian children between the ages of 2-17 years old are overweight or obese. Projecting this trend forward should it continue, we can expect 70% of 35-44 year olds in Canada to be overweight or obese in 20 years.

So next time when you order something, ask yourself if it is the right portion size for you.

Changing Trends.

Advertising and public perception has sure changed a lot over the last 50 years. Could you imagine the outcry today if these plastered the billboards? It sort of makes you wonder what practices we do today that one day our children are going to look at with disgusted looks.

Back when I was still a medical student, we were required to wear ties to our clinical visits. If you forgot to wear one, they sent you home to get one. It wasn’t until later on that we stopped wearing ties because they figured out nobody washes their ties, so it was just spreading germs everywhere. For the same reason, our white coat sleeves have been getting shorter and shorter as well.
ER Doctor speaks on the changing clothing trends to prevent nosocomial infections after a classmate comments on how “unfitted” his sleeves were for the white coat he had ordered.